flexuous

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flex·u·ous

 (flĕk′sho͞o-əs)
adj.
Bending or winding alternately from side to side; sinuous.

[From Latin flexuōsus, from flexus, a bending, a turning, from past participle of flectere, to bend.]

flex′u·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē) n.
flex′u·ous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flexuous

(ˈflɛksjʊəs) or

flexuose

adj
1. full of bends or curves; winding
2. variable; unsteady
[C17: from Latin flexuōsus full of bends, tortuous, from flexus a bending; see flex]
ˈflexuously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flex•u•ous

(ˈflɛk ʃu əs)

adj.
full of bends or curves; sinuous; winding.
[1595–1605; < Latin flexuōsus=flexu(s) (see flex1) + -ōsus -ous]
flex`u•os′i•ty (-ˈɒs ɪ ti) n.
flex′u•ous•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.flexuous - having turns or windings; "the flexuous bed of the stream"
curved, curving - having or marked by a curve or smoothly rounded bend; "the curved tusks of a walrus"; "his curved lips suggested a smile but his eyes were hard"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

flexuous

adjective
1. Repeatedly curving in alternate directions:
2. Capable of being shaped, bent, or drawn out, as by hammering or pressure:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The word flexie, referring to a childbirth malady, is slang or dialectal and is no doubt related to Latin flex which surfaced in flexuosity or flexure.