flyer

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fly·er

 (flī′ər)
n.
Variant of flier.

flyer

(ˈflaɪə) or

flier

n
1. a person or thing that flies or moves very fast
2. (Aeronautics) an aviator or pilot
3. informal a long flying leap; bound
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a fast-moving machine part, esp one having periodic motion
5. (Building) a rectangular step in a straight flight of stairs. Compare winder5
6. athletics an informal word for flying start
7. chiefly US a speculative business transaction
8. a small handbill

fli•er

or fly•er

(ˈflaɪ ər)

n.
1. one that flies.
2. an aviator or pilot.
3. a small handbill; circular.
4. a risky or speculative venture.
5. one of the steps in a straight flight of stairs.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flyer - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distributionflyer - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution; "he mailed the circular to all subscribers"
ad, advert, advertisement, advertising, advertizement, advertizing - a public promotion of some product or service
stuffer - an advertising circular that is enclosed with other material and (usually) sent by mail
2.flyer - someone who travels by air
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
3.flyer - someone who operates an aircraftflyer - someone who operates an aircraft  
airwoman, aviatress, aviatrix - a woman aviator
airplane pilot, pilot - someone who is licensed to operate an aircraft in flight
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills

flyer

flier
noun
1. (Old-fashioned) pilot, aeronaut, airman or airwoman, aviator or aviatrix escape lines for shot-down allied flyers
2. air traveller, air passenger regular business flyers
3. handbill, bill, notice, leaf, release, literature (informal), leaflet, advert (Brit. informal), circular, booklet, pamphlet, handout, throwaway (U.S.), promotional material, publicity material posters, newsletters and flyers
4. jump, spring, bound, leap, hurdle, vault, jeté, flying or running jump At this point he took a flyer off the front.
5. goer, runner, sprinter, racer, scorcher (informal), speed demon or merchant (informal) This horse is a real flyer.
Translations
letákletec
brochureflyrejsendeløbeseddelpilot
röplap
flugmaîur
letákletec
lepakletalecletalski potnik
el ilânıpilot

flyer

[ˈflaɪər] = flierfly-fishing [ˈflaɪfɪʃɪŋ] npêche f à la mouche

fly2

(flai) past tense flew (fluː) : past participle flown (floun) verb
1. to (make something) go through the air on wings etc or in an aeroplane. The pilot flew (the plane) across the sea.
2. to run away (from). He flew (the country).
3. (of time) to pass quickly. The days flew past.
ˈflyer, ˈflier noun
1. a person who flies an aeroplane etc or is in one.
2. a sheet of paper advertising a product, event etc. handing out flyers to passers-by.
flying saucer
a strange flying object thought possibly to come from another planet.
flying visit
a very short, often unexpected, visit. She paid her mother a flying visit.
frequent flyer/flier noun
a passenger who flies frequently in the same airline and receives bonuses accordingly.
ˈflyleaf noun
a blank page at the beginning or end of a book.
ˈflyover noun
a road etc which is built up so as to cross above another. a flyover across the motorway.
fly in the face of
to oppose or defy; to treat with contempt. He flew in the face of danger.
fly into
suddenly to get into (a rage, a temper etc).
fly off the handle
to lose one's temper.
get off to a flying start
to have a very successful beginning. Our new shop has got off to a flying start.
let fly (often with at)
to throw, shoot or send out violently. He let fly (an arrow) at the target.
send (someone/something) flying
to hit or knock someone or something so that he or it falls down or falls backwards. She hit him and sent him flying.
References in classic literature ?
Volley after volley they vomited upon the temple guards; volley on volley crashed through the thin air toward the fleeting and illusive fliers.
The sight of them in the open brought a score of fliers darting toward us from all directions.
They were small fliers for the most part, built for two to three men.
It was easy to see why the Kaolians needed no navy; their cities, hidden in the midst of this towering forest, must be entirely invisible from above, nor could a landing be made by any but the smallest fliers, and then only with the greatest risk of accident.
As I toppled from the tower into the horrid abyss below I counted myself already dead; and Thurid must have done likewise, for he evidently did not even trouble himself to look after me, but must have turned and mounted the waiting flier at once.
Several others attempted to escape, but they were soon surrounded by thousands of tiny individual fliers, and above each hung a monster battleship of Helium ready to drop boarding parties upon their decks.
There was an extremely pathetic side to the surrender of these mighty fliers, the result of an age-old custom which demanded that surrender should be signalized by the voluntary plunging to earth of the commander of the vanquished vessel.
As a consequence, the Northern and North-western upper levels have been practically abandoned, and the high fliers have returned to the ignoble security of the Three, Five, and Six hundred foot levels.
Far out across the ochre sea-bottoms beyond the twin cities of Helium raced the swift flier of Tara of Helium.
At the recurring thought, Tara of Helium could feel her whole body burning with scarlet shame and then she went suddenly white and cold with rage; whereupon she turned her flier about so abruptly that she was all but torn from her lashings upon the flat, narrow deck.
He had come alone in a small flier, sure of the same welcome that always awaited him at Ptarth.
To Thuvan Dihn he explained that he had been but testing an invention of his own with which his flier was equipped--a clever improvement of the ordinary Martian air compass, which, when set for a certain destination, will remain constantly fixed thereon, making it only necessary to keep a vessel's prow always in the direction of the compass needle to reach any given point upon Barsoom by the shortest route.