flint


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Flint

 (flĭnt)
A city of southeast-central Michigan north-northwest of Detroit. Founded on the site of a fur-trading post established in 1819, it became an automobile-manufacturing center in the early 1900s.

flint

 (flĭnt)
n.
1. A very hard, fine-grained quartz that sparks when struck with steel.
2.
a. A piece of flint used to produce a spark.
b. A small solid cylinder of a spark-producing alloy, used in lighters to ignite the fuel.
3. A piece of flint used as a tool by prehistoric humans.
4. Something resembling flint in hardness: a jaw of flint.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

flint

(flɪnt)
n
1. (Minerals) an impure opaque microcrystalline greyish-black form of quartz that occurs in chalk. It produces sparks when struck with steel and is used in the manufacture of pottery, flint glass, and road-construction materials. Formula: SiO2
2. any piece of flint, esp one used as a primitive tool or for striking fire
3. a small cylindrical piece of an iron alloy, used in cigarette lighters
4. (General Physics) Also called: flint glass or white flint colourless glass other than plate glass
5. (Tools) See optical flint
vb
(tr) to fit or provide with a flint
[Old English; related to Old High German flins, Old Swedish flinta splinter of stone, Latin splendēre to shine]

Flint

(flɪnt)
n
1. (Placename) a town in NE Wales, in Flintshire, on the Dee estuary. Pop: 11 936 (2001)
2. (Placename) a city in SE Michigan: closure of the car production plants led to a high level of unemployment. Pop: 120 292 (2003 est)

flint

(flɪnt)

n.
1. a hard stone, a form of silica resembling chalcedony but more opaque, less pure, and less lustrous.
2. a piece of this, esp. as used for striking fire.
3. a chunk of this used as a primitive tool or as the core from which such a tool was struck.
4. something very hard or unyielding.
5. a small piece of metal alloy used to produce a spark in a cigarette lighter.
v.t.
6. to furnish with flint.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English]
flint′like`, adj.

Flint

(flɪnt)

n.
1. a city in SE Michigan. 141,620.

flint

(flĭnt)
A very hard, gray to black sedimentary rock that makes sparks when it is struck with steel. Flint is a type of chert.

flint


Past participle: flinted
Gerund: flinting

Imperative
flint
flint
Present
I flint
you flint
he/she/it flints
we flint
you flint
they flint
Preterite
I flinted
you flinted
he/she/it flinted
we flinted
you flinted
they flinted
Present Continuous
I am flinting
you are flinting
he/she/it is flinting
we are flinting
you are flinting
they are flinting
Present Perfect
I have flinted
you have flinted
he/she/it has flinted
we have flinted
you have flinted
they have flinted
Past Continuous
I was flinting
you were flinting
he/she/it was flinting
we were flinting
you were flinting
they were flinting
Past Perfect
I had flinted
you had flinted
he/she/it had flinted
we had flinted
you had flinted
they had flinted
Future
I will flint
you will flint
he/she/it will flint
we will flint
you will flint
they will flint
Future Perfect
I will have flinted
you will have flinted
he/she/it will have flinted
we will have flinted
you will have flinted
they will have flinted
Future Continuous
I will be flinting
you will be flinting
he/she/it will be flinting
we will be flinting
you will be flinting
they will be flinting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flinting
you have been flinting
he/she/it has been flinting
we have been flinting
you have been flinting
they have been flinting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flinting
you will have been flinting
he/she/it will have been flinting
we will have been flinting
you will have been flinting
they will have been flinting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flinting
you had been flinting
he/she/it had been flinting
we had been flinting
you had been flinting
they had been flinting
Conditional
I would flint
you would flint
he/she/it would flint
we would flint
you would flint
they would flint
Past Conditional
I would have flinted
you would have flinted
he/she/it would have flinted
we would have flinted
you would have flinted
they would have flinted

flint

Dark, smooth, shiny chert.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flint - a hard kind of stoneflint - a hard kind of stone; a form of silica more opaque than chalcedony
gunflint - the piece of flint that provides the igniting spark in a flintlock weapon
firestone - a piece of flint that is struck to light a fire
flintstone - pebbles of flint used in masonry construction
silica, silicon dioxide, silicon oxide - a white or colorless vitreous insoluble solid (SiO2); various forms occur widely in the earth's crust as quartz or cristobalite or tridymite or lechatelierite
2.Flint - a river in western Georgia that flows generally south to join the Chattahoochee River at the Florida border where they form the Apalachicola River
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
3.Flint - a city in southeast central Michigan near Detroit; automobile manufacturing
Great Lakes State, Michigan, Wolverine State, MI - a midwestern state in north central United States in the Great Lakes region
Adj.1.flint - showing unfeeling resistance to tender feelings; "his flinty gaze"; "the child's misery would move even the most obdurate heart"
hardhearted, heartless - lacking in feeling or pity or warmth
Translations
حَجر قَدّاحَهصَوّان
pazourekkamínek
flintflintestensten
kovakõtûzkõ
eldsteinn, kvarssteinntinnatinna, tinnusteinn
akmenėlistitnagas
krama-krams
kamienokpazúrik
çakmak taşı

flint

[flɪnt]
A. N (Geol) (= material) → sílex m; (= one piece) → pedernal m; [of lighter] → piedra f
B. CPD flint axe Nhacha f de sílex

flint

[ˈflɪnt]
n
(= stone) → silex m
(in lighter)pierre f (à briquet)
modif [arrowhead, tool] → en silex

flint

n
(for cigarette lighter) → Feuerstein m
(= stone)Feuerstein m, → Flint(stein) m

flint

:
flint axe
n(Feuer)steinbeil nt
flint glass
nFlintglas nt
flintlock
nSteinschlossgewehr nt

flint

[flɪnt] n (Geol) → selce f; (for lighter) → pietrina

flint

(flint) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) a kind of very hard stone. Prehistoric man used flint knives.
2. a piece of hard mineral from which sparks can be struck. I must buy a new flint for my cigarette-lighter.
References in classic literature ?
I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain.
For instance, what reader but knows that Mr Allworthy felt, at first, for the loss of his friend, those emotions of grief, which on such occasions enter into all men whose hearts are not composed of flint, or their heads of as solid materials?
They laid the blame, however, entirely on their guns; two miserable old pieces with flint locks, which, with all their picking and hammering, were continually apt to miss fire.
Again the Castor and Pollux of the wilderness sallied forth, and again their flint guns were at fault, and missed fire, and nothing went off but the buffalo.
He took out a blackened pipe, filled it, lighted it with flint and steel, pulled at it until it was in a bright glow: then, suddenly held it from him and dropped something into it from between his finger and thumb, that blazed and went out in a puff of smoke.
Thus it was, however; and the last drop of blood having been extracted from the flints, and the last screw of the rack having been turned so often that its purchase crumbled, and it now turned and turned with nothing to bite, Monseigneur began to run away from a phenomenon so low and unaccountable.
I am the only man whom Barbecue feared," he urged, "and Flint feared Barbecue.
Don't be crabbed, my boy,” said the other, who was very coolly fixing his flint.
By this time the old hunter was ready for his business, and throwing his right leg far behind him, and stretching his left arm along the barrel of his piece, he raised it toward the bird, Every eye glanced rapidly from the marks man to the mark; but at the moment when each ear was expecting the report of the rifle, they were disappointed by the ticking sound of the flint.
Or perhaps your flints are giving out, or are worn out- that happens sometimes, you know.
They have a kind of hard flints, which, by grinding against other stones, they form into instruments, that serve instead of wedges, axes, and hammers.
He bolts down all events, all creeds, and beliefs, and persuasions, all hard things visible and invisible, never mind how knobby; as an ostrich of potent digestion gobbles down bullets and gun flints.