floatage

float·age

 (flō′tĭj)
n.
Variant of flotage.

floatage

(ˈfləʊtɪdʒ)
n
a variant spelling of flotage
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References in periodicals archive ?
Based on Presidential Decree 1067 or the Water Code of the Philippines, banks of rivers and streams -- as well as shores of seas and lakes 'throughout their entire length and within a zone of three meters in urban areas, 20 meters in agricultural areas and forty meters in forest areas, along their margins are subject to the easement of public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing and salvage.'
'No person shall be allowed to stay in this zone longer than what is necessary for recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing or salvage or to build structures of any kind,' the law also reads.
Article 51 of the said Water Code states that "the banks of rivers and streams and the shores of the seas and lakes throughout their entire length and within three meters in urban areas, 20 meters in agricultural areas and 40 meters in forest areas, along their margins are subject to the easement of public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing and salvage.
The air dissolved may act as a barrier to dissolution when adhered in the dosage unit and basket mesh, or may facilitate the dissolution with increase of floatage of the particles (DRESSMAN; KRAMER, 2005).
Under Article 51 of that code, "banks of rivers and streams and the shores of the seas and lakes throughout their entire length and within a zone of three meters in urban areas, 20 meters in agricultural areas and 40 meters in forest areas, along their margins are subject to the easement of public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing and salvage".
(26) The Water Code is the most important law regulating land adjacent to the foreshore and defines the size of the easement zone, the number of metres from normal high tide and inland which is intended for 'public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing and salvage'.
floatage easement, applies to privately owned waters that are
Under the law, it is prohibited for any person to stay in this zone longer than what is necessary for recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing or salvage or to build structure of any kind within the legal easements.
Each state has a different approach to water access, providing recreational users with varying degrees of access, floatage, and portage rights.
One way states provide for public use of water is by allowing a public floatage easement over waters navigable-in-fact but not meeting the federal title navigability test.