floats


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float

 (flōt)
v. float·ed, float·ing, floats
v.intr.
1.
a. To remain suspended within or on the surface of a fluid without sinking.
b. To be suspended in or move through space as if supported by a liquid.
2. To move from place to place, especially at random.
3. To move easily or lightly: "Miss Golightly ... floated round in their arms light as a scarf" (Truman Capote).
4. Economics To rise or fall freely in response to the market: allowed the dollar to float; a loan whose interest rate floats with the prime rate.
v.tr.
1. To cause to remain suspended without sinking or falling.
2.
a. To put into the water; launch: float a ship; float a navy.
b. To start or establish (a business enterprise, for example).
3. To flood (land), as for irrigation.
4. Economics To allow (the exchange value of a currency, for example) to rise or fall freely in response to the market: Inflation forced the government to float the currency.
5. To offer for consideration; suggest: floated my idea to the committee.
6. To release (a security) for sale.
7. To arrange for (a loan).
8. To make the surface of (plaster, for example) level or smooth.
9. Computers To convert (data) from fixed-point notation to floating-point notation.
n.
1. Something that floats, as:
a. A raft.
b. A buoy.
c. A life preserver.
d. A buoyant object, such as a piece of cork or a plastic ball, used to hold a net or part of a fishing line afloat.
e. A landing platform attached to a wharf and floating on the water.
f. A floating ball attached to a lever to regulate the water level in a tank.
2. Biology An air-filled sac or structure that aids in the flotation of an aquatic organism. Also called air bladder, air vesicle.
3. A decorated exhibit or scene mounted on a mobile platform and pulled or driven in a parade.
4. The number of shares of a security that are publicly owned and traded.
5.
a. A sum of money representing checks that are outstanding.
b. The time between the issuing or depositing of a check and the debiting of the issuer's account.
c. The time during which a credit card purchase can be repaid without interest.
6.
a. A tool for smoothing the surface of wet plaster or concrete.
b. A file with sharp ridges used for cutting or smoothing wood.
7. A soft drink with ice cream floating in it.
8. Excess time allowed for a task in a project schedule.

[Middle English floten, from Old English flotian; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

float′a·ble adj.

floats

(fləʊts)
pl n
(Theatre) theatre another word for footlights

floats

Footlights, because thy were originally wicks floating in bowls of oil.
References in classic literature ?
From the loftiest point of its roof, during precisely three and a half hours of each forenoon, floats or droops, in breeze or calm, the banner of the republic; but with the thirteen stripes turned vertically, instead of horizontally, and thus indicating that a civil, and not a military, post of Uncle Sam's government is here established.
And now behold Jonah taken up as an anchor and dropped into the sea; when instantly an oily calmness floats out from the east, and the sea is still, as Jonah carries down the gale with him, leaving smooth water behind.
slowly it floats more and more away, the water round it torn and splashed by the insatiate sharks, and the air above vexed with rapacious flights of screaming fowls, whose beaks are like so many insulting poniards in the whale.
Then Tamoszius Kuszleika, after replenishing himself with a pot of beer, returns to his platform, and, standing up, reviews the scene; he taps authoritatively upon the side of his violin, then tucks it carefully under his chin, then waves his bow in an elaborate flourish, and finally smites the sounding strings and closes his eyes, and floats away in spirit upon the wings of a dreamy waltz.
His high black plume floats abroad over the throng, like a raven over the field of the slain.
The only way of passing it is upon floats, which they guide as well as they can with long poles.
My soul, from this strait prison-house set free, As o'er the Stygian lake it floats along, Thy praises singing still shall hold its way, And make the waters of oblivion stay.
From house to house warm winter robes are spread, And through the pine-woods red Floats up the sound of the washerman's bat who plies His hurried task ere the brief noon wanes and dies.
It is an island that floats (as it were) upon the sea, {83} iron bound with a wall that girds it.
In the morning and the evening, when the wind is lulled, the smoke rises perpendicularly in a blue column, or floats in light clouds above the tree-tops, and can be discovered from afar.
As a matter of fact, nothing is ever cast in that sense on board ship but the lead, of which a cast is taken to search the depth of water on which she floats.
Ahead of us floats an ancient, aluminum-patched, twin-screw tramp of the dingiest, with no more right to the 5000-foot lane than has a horse-cart to a modern road.