flog

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flog

a fake blog that promotes products
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

flog

 (flŏg, flôg)
tr.v. flogged, flog·ging, flogs
1. To beat severely with a whip or rod.
2. Informal To publicize aggressively: flogging a new book.

[Perhaps from alteration of Latin flagellāre; see flagellate.]

flog′ger n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flog

(flɒɡ)
vb, flogs, flogging or flogged
1. (tr) to beat harshly, esp with a whip, strap, etc
2. (tr) slang Brit to sell
3. (Nautical Terms) (intr) (of a sail) to flap noisily in the wind
4. (intr) to make progress by painful work
5. NZ to steal
6. flog a dead horse chiefly
a. to harp on some long discarded subject
b. to pursue the solution of a problem long realized to be insoluble
7. flog to death to persuade a person so persistently of the value of (an idea or venture) that he or she loses interest in it
[C17: probably from Latin flagellāre; see flagellant]
ˈflogger n
ˈflogging n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flog

(flɒg, flɔg)

v.t. flogged, flog•ging.
1. to beat with a whip, stick, etc., esp. as punishment.
2. Slang.
a. to sell, esp. aggressively or vigorously.
b. to promote; publicize.
[1670–80; compare flagellate]
flog′ga•ble, adj.
flog′ger, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flog


Past participle: flogged
Gerund: flogging

Imperative
flog
flog
Present
I flog
you flog
he/she/it flogs
we flog
you flog
they flog
Preterite
I flogged
you flogged
he/she/it flogged
we flogged
you flogged
they flogged
Present Continuous
I am flogging
you are flogging
he/she/it is flogging
we are flogging
you are flogging
they are flogging
Present Perfect
I have flogged
you have flogged
he/she/it has flogged
we have flogged
you have flogged
they have flogged
Past Continuous
I was flogging
you were flogging
he/she/it was flogging
we were flogging
you were flogging
they were flogging
Past Perfect
I had flogged
you had flogged
he/she/it had flogged
we had flogged
you had flogged
they had flogged
Future
I will flog
you will flog
he/she/it will flog
we will flog
you will flog
they will flog
Future Perfect
I will have flogged
you will have flogged
he/she/it will have flogged
we will have flogged
you will have flogged
they will have flogged
Future Continuous
I will be flogging
you will be flogging
he/she/it will be flogging
we will be flogging
you will be flogging
they will be flogging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flogging
you have been flogging
he/she/it has been flogging
we have been flogging
you have been flogging
they have been flogging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flogging
you will have been flogging
he/she/it will have been flogging
we will have been flogging
you will have been flogging
they will have been flogging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flogging
you had been flogging
he/she/it had been flogging
we had been flogging
you had been flogging
they had been flogging
Conditional
I would flog
you would flog
he/she/it would flog
we would flog
you would flog
they would flog
Past Conditional
I would have flogged
you would have flogged
he/she/it would have flogged
we would have flogged
you would have flogged
they would have flogged
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.flog - beat severely with a whip or rodflog - beat severely with a whip or rod; "The teacher often flogged the students"; "The children were severely trounced"
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
flagellate, scourge - whip; "The religious fanatics flagellated themselves"
leather - whip with a leather strap
horsewhip - whip with a whip intended for horses
switch - flog with or as if with a flexible rod
cowhide - flog with a cowhide
cat - beat with a cat-o'-nine-tails
birch - whip with a birch twig
2.flog - beat with a cane
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

flog

verb
1. sell, market, trade, dispose of, put up for sale They are trying to flog their house.
2. beat, whip, lash, thrash, whack, scourge, hit hard, trounce, castigate, chastise, flay, lambast(e), flagellate, punish severely Flog them soundly!
3. strain, drive, tax, push, punish, oppress, overtax, overexert Don't flog yourself. We've got ages.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

flog

verb
To punish with blows or lashes:
Informal: trim.
Slang: lay into, lick.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَجْلِد، يَضْرِب بالسَّوْط
bičovat
bankepiske
piestäpiiskataruoskia
hÿîa
čaižytinuplakimastuščiai stengtis
pērtsist
kamçılamakkırbaçlamak

flog

[flɒg] VT
1. (= whip) → azotar; (= beat) → dar una paliza a
to flog a dead horsepredicar en el desierto, machacar en hierro frío
2. (Brit) (= sell) → vender
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flog

[ˈflɒg] vt
(= whip) [+ person] → flageller
to flog a dead horse → s'acharner inutilement
(= sell) → fourguer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

flog

vt
(= beat)prügeln, schlagen; thief, mutineerauspeitschen; you’re flogging a dead horse (esp Brit inf) → Sie verschwenden Ihre Zeit
(Brit inf: = sell) → verkloppen, verscherbeln, losschlagen (all inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

flog

[flɒg] vtfrustare, flagellare
to flog a dead horse (fig, fam) → perdere il proprio tempo
to flog o.s. to death (fig, fam) → ammazzarsi di fatica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

flog

(flog) verbpast tense, past participle flogged
to beat; to whip. You will be flogged for stealing the money.
ˈflogging noun
flog a dead horse
to try to create interest in something after all interest in it has been lost.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He has already caught several of his own pupils, and gives them lines to learn, while he sends East and Tom, who are not his pupils, up to the Doctor, who, on learning that they had been at prayers in the morning, flogs them soundly.
Now, ye jest take this yer gal and flog her; ye've seen enough on't to know how."
We live in freedom, but you bow down to and slave for men, who in return for your services flog you with whips and put collars on your necks.
The new bit was very painful, and I reared up suddenly, which angered him still more, and he began to flog me.
Till it weeps both night and day: And they scourge the weak, and flog the fool,