flotilla


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flo·til·la

 (flō-tĭl′ə)
n.
1.
a. A small fleet.
b. A fleet of small craft.
2. A naval unit consisting of two or more squadrons of small warships.
3. Informal A group of vehicles owned or operated as a unit: a flotilla of limousines.

[Spanish, diminutive of flota, fleet, from Old French flote, from Old Norse floti; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flotilla

(fləˈtɪlə)
n
(Nautical Terms) a small fleet or a fleet of small vessels
[C18: from Spanish flota fleet, from French flotte, ultimately from Old Norse floti]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flo•til•la

(floʊˈtɪl ə)

n.
1. a group of small naval vessels, esp. a naval unit containing two or more squadrons.
2. a group moving together.
[1705–15; < Sp, diminutive of flota fleet < French flotte < Germanic; see float]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Flotilla

 a small fleet, 1711; a fleet of small vessels. See also armada, flote.
Examples: flotilla of boats; of fishing boats, 1826; of destroyers; of proverbs.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flotilla - a United States Navy fleet consisting of two or more squadrons of small warshipsflotilla - a United States Navy fleet consisting of two or more squadrons of small warships
fleet - a group of warships organized as a tactical unit
2.flotilla - a fleet of small craft
fleet - a group of warships organized as a tactical unit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
أسْطول صَغير
flotila
flotille
flottilla
floti lítilla skipa
flotilė
flotile
flotillaküçük filo

flotilla

[fləˈtɪlə] Nflotilla f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flotilla

[fləˈtɪlə] n [ships] → flottille f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

flotilla

nFlotille f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

flotilla

(fləˈtilə) noun
a fleet of small ships. A flotilla of yachts.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Eight days after its departure, the Tampico returned into the bay of Espiritu Santo, with a whole flotilla of steamboats.
PASSAGE FROM THE CRUISING GROUND TO THE MARQUESAS--SLEEPY TIMES ABOARD SHIP--SOUTH SEA SCENERY--LAND HO--THE FRENCH SQUADRON DISCOVERED AT ANCHOR IN THE BAY OF NUKUHEVA--STRANGE PILOT-- ESCORT OF CANOES--A FLOTILLA OF COCOANUTS--SWIMMING VISITORS--THE DOLLY BOARDED BY THEM--STATE OF AFFAIRS THAT ENSUE
"Monseigneur, to provision a fleet, to assemble a flotilla, to enroll your maritime force, would take an admiral a year.
He remounted the bridge, and guided the steamer through the flotilla of junks, tankas, and fishing boats which crowd the harbour of Hong Kong.
"Well, are we all ready to start?" he continued, as he looked over the little flotilla which carried his party and his goods.
Those belonging to the little Cairo line and the little Memphis line always stopped; the big Orleans liners stopped for hails only, or to land passengers or freight; and this was the case also with the great flotilla of "transients." These latter came out of a dozen rivers-- the Illinois, the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Monongahela, the Tennessee, the Red River, the White River, and so on--and were bound every whither and stocked with every imaginable comfort or necessity, which the Mississippi's communities could want, from the frosty Falls of St.
One by one, and noiselessly, we shoved them off and made them fast in an awkward flotilla. Just as we were shoving off the last skiff, our own, one of the men came upon us.
A broad stream of dazzling foam trailed behind the flotilla. The canoes appeared very black on the white hiss of water; turbaned heads swayed back and forth; a multitude of arms in crimson and yellow rose and fell with one movement; the spearmen upright in the bows of canoes had variegated sarongs and gleaming shoulders like bronze statues; the muttered strophes of the paddlers' song ended periodically in a plaintive shout.
But long before the declaration of war--indeed,on Whit Monday--the whole German fleet of eighteen battleships, with a flotilla of fuel tenders and converted liners containing stores to be used in support of the air-fleet, had passed through the straits of Dover and headed boldly for New York.
Nearby one of the ship's officers was shouting orders to a flotilla of native boats that was approaching to lighter the consignment of the steamer's cargo destined for this tiny post.
I was sure that with definite plans to go by Perry could oversee the construction of an adequate flotilla.
Sweeping over the glassy surface was a great flotilla of canoes coming straight for the shore upon which we stood.