flounce

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flounce 1

 (flouns)
n.
A strip of decorative, usually gathered or pleated material attached by one edge, as on a garment or curtain.
tr.v. flounced, flounc·ing, flounc·es
To trim with a strip or strips of gathered or pleated material.

[Alteration of frounce, from Middle English, pleat, from Old French fronce, of Germanic origin; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

flounce 2

 (flouns)
intr.v. flounced, flounc·ing, flounc·es
1.
a. To move in a lively or bouncy manner: The children flounced around the room in their costumes.
b. To move with exaggerated or affected motions: flounced petulantly out of the house.
2. To move clumsily; flounder.
n.
The act or motion of flouncing.

[Possibly of Scandinavian origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flounce

(flaʊns)
vb
(intr; often foll by about, away, out, etc) to move or go with emphatic or impatient movements
n
the act of flouncing
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian flunsa to hurry, Swedish flunsa to splash]

flounce

(flaʊns)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) an ornamental gathered ruffle sewn to a garment by its top edge
[C18: from Old French fronce wrinkle, from froncir to wrinkle, of Germanic origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flounce1

(flaʊns)

v. flounced, flounc•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to go with impatient or impetuous, exaggerated movements.
2. to move self-consciously and in a conspicuous manner.
3. to throw the body about spasmodically; flounder.
n.
4. an act or instance of flouncing; a flouncing movement.
[1535–45; perhaps akin to Norwegian flunsa to hurry]
flounc′y, adj. flounc•i•er, flounc•i•est.

flounce2

(flaʊns)

n., v. flounced, flounc•ing. n.
1. a strip of material gathered or pleated and attached along one edge, with the other edge left loose or hanging: used for trimming.
v.t.
2. to trim with flounces.
[1665–75; alter. of frounce pleat, fold, wrinkle, Middle English < Old French fronce < Frankish]
flounc′y, adj. flounc•i•er, flounc•i•est.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flounce

- Can mean a sudden fling or jerk of the body or a limb.
See also related terms for jerk.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

flounce


Past participle: flounced
Gerund: flouncing

Imperative
flounce
flounce
Present
I flounce
you flounce
he/she/it flounces
we flounce
you flounce
they flounce
Preterite
I flounced
you flounced
he/she/it flounced
we flounced
you flounced
they flounced
Present Continuous
I am flouncing
you are flouncing
he/she/it is flouncing
we are flouncing
you are flouncing
they are flouncing
Present Perfect
I have flounced
you have flounced
he/she/it has flounced
we have flounced
you have flounced
they have flounced
Past Continuous
I was flouncing
you were flouncing
he/she/it was flouncing
we were flouncing
you were flouncing
they were flouncing
Past Perfect
I had flounced
you had flounced
he/she/it had flounced
we had flounced
you had flounced
they had flounced
Future
I will flounce
you will flounce
he/she/it will flounce
we will flounce
you will flounce
they will flounce
Future Perfect
I will have flounced
you will have flounced
he/she/it will have flounced
we will have flounced
you will have flounced
they will have flounced
Future Continuous
I will be flouncing
you will be flouncing
he/she/it will be flouncing
we will be flouncing
you will be flouncing
they will be flouncing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flouncing
you have been flouncing
he/she/it has been flouncing
we have been flouncing
you have been flouncing
they have been flouncing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flouncing
you will have been flouncing
he/she/it will have been flouncing
we will have been flouncing
you will have been flouncing
they will have been flouncing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flouncing
you had been flouncing
he/she/it had been flouncing
we had been flouncing
you had been flouncing
they had been flouncing
Conditional
I would flounce
you would flounce
he/she/it would flounce
we would flounce
you would flounce
they would flounce
Past Conditional
I would have flounced
you would have flounced
he/she/it would have flounced
we would have flounced
you would have flounced
they would have flounced
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flounce - a strip of pleated material used as a decoration or a trimflounce - a strip of pleated material used as a decoration or a trim
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
gauffer, goffer - an ornamental frill made by pressing pleats
jabot - a ruffle on the front of a woman's blouse or a man's shirt
peplum - a flared ruffle attached to the waistline of a dress or jacket or blouse
2.flounce - the act of walking with exaggerated jerky motions
gait - a person's manner of walking
Verb1.flounce - walk emphatically
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

flounce

1
verb bounce, storm, stamp, go quickly, throw, spring, toss, fling, jerk She flounced out of my room in a huff.

flounce

2
noun ruffle, gathering, tuck, frill, ruff, furbelow a gown with a flounce round the hem
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

flounce

verb
To walk with exaggerated or unnatural motions expressive of self-importance or self-display:
Informal: sashay.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
هُدْب الثَّوْبيَنْدَفِع غاضِبا
naštvaně odejítvolánek
flæsemarcherespankulere
bryddingstrunsa, rigsa
drāztiesmestiesvolāns
nahnevane odísť
atılmakfarbalafırfırfırlamakkırma

flounce

1 [flaʊns] N (= frill) → volante m

flounce

2 [flaʊns] VI to flounce in/outentrar/salir haciendo aspavientos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flounce

[ˈflaʊns] n (= frill) → volant m
flounce off
vi (= leave in a huff) → sortir dans un mouvement d'humeur
flounce out
visortir dans un mouvement d'humeur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

flounce

1
vistolzieren; to flounce in/out/aroundherein-/heraus-/herumstolzieren
n she turned on her heel with a flouncesie drehte sich pikiert auf dem Absatz um

flounce

2
n (= frill)Volant m, → Rüsche f
vtmit einem Volant/Volants or Rüschen besetzen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

flounce

1 [flaʊns]
1. vi to flounce in/outentrare/uscire stizzito/a
2. nbalzo

flounce

2 [flaʊns] n (frill) → balza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

flounce1

(flauns) verb
(usually with out, ~away etc) to move (away) in anger, impatience etc. She flounced out of the room.

flounce2

(flauns) noun
a decorative strip of material usually frilled. There are flounces at the bottom of her evening skirt.
flounced adjective
decorated with a flounce.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
That dark-green one is so pretty and it was sweet of you to put on the flounce. Of course I know it wasn't really necessary, but flounces are so stylish this fall and Josie Pye has flounces on all her dresses.
Her gown was of black velvet, with tight sleeves and sloping shoulders, and the skirt had three large flounces. She wore a black bonnet with velvet strings.
The upper skirt will be made scanter, and finished with a frill; then the waist can be refreshed with the best parts of these wide flounces, and out of those new bits we will concoct a hat.
(through a door that was always open, and a looped- back yellow damask portiere) the unexpected vista of a bedroom with a huge low bed upholstered like a sofa, and a toilet-table with frivolous lace flounces and a gilt-framed mirror.
Lecount lifted the outer of the two flounces which ran round the bottom of the dress one over the other, softly cut away a little irregular fragment of stuff from the inner flounce, and neatly smoothed the outer one over it again, so as to hide the gap.
The equipages are as varied as the company and attract as much attention, especially the low basket barouches in which ladies drive themselves, with a pair of dashing ponies, gay nets to keep their voluminous flounces from overflowing the diminutive vehicles, and little grooms on the perch behind.
Could a few young ladies, too, be persuaded to become a little more prominent, and quit their mother's apron-strings, it would add vastly to the grouping, and relieve the stiffness of the "shin- pieces" of formal rows of dark-looking men, and of the flounces of pretty women.
I remember that the Baroness was clad in a voluminous silk dress, pale grey in colour, and adorned with flounces and a crinoline and train.
I shall conciliate her presently; the divine pout (so childish it was!) is fading from her lips; the starlight is on the tulle and lace and roses of her pretty evening dress, with its festooned skirts and obsolete flounces; and I am watching her, ay, and worshipping her, though I do not know it yet.
And it had become a sort of game among them to sit a close as possible to their aunt, to touch her, hold her little hand, kiss it, play with her ring, or even touch the flounce of her skirt.
At first he had enjoined the actors, who had stopped in suspense, to continue, and to raise their voices; then, perceiving that no one was listening, he had stopped them; and, during the entire quarter of an hour that the interruption lasted, he had not ceased to stamp, to flounce about, to appeal to Gisquette and Liénarde, and to urge his neighbors to the continuance of the prologue; all in vain.
Dust off your gathering skills to create ruffles, flounces and cuffs, plus discover a quick method for changing a facing into a neckband.