fluid dynamics


Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to fluid dynamics: fluid mechanics

fluid dynamics

n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of fluid mechanics concerned with the movement of gases and liquids.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the EWRI (Environmental & Water Resources Institute) Computational Fluid Dynamics Task Committee, this 23-chapter book introduces computational fluid dynamics and its use in the water and wastewater industry.
How cool is it to see a tribute to a mathematician known for her work on partial differential equations and fluid dynamics!" a (https://twitter.com/mathspace/status/1103552611527999488) user wrote.
NanoFluidX is a fluid dynamics simulation tool based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to predict the flow in complex geometries with complex motion.
Fluid dynamics is "the branch of applied science that is concerned with the movement of liquids and gases", according to the American Heritage Dictionary.
On another level, to another group, fluid dynamics refer to a task, a chore, a necessary assignment that is among the most unappealing, distasteful and disgusting practices ...
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were carried out to compare test results with a range of flow conditions.
He also described the operation of a Jet fan with examples of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and specifically mentioned that the CFD software that the S&P is using is developed in-house by the S&P engineering design team and is the most accurate analysis available in the industry.
The Madelung equations are Eulerian and very directly show the relationship between fluid dynamics and quantum mechanics.
By using real drying properties established by single droplet experiments, the Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations provide far more precise results.
Intended as a textbook for courses in computational fluid dynamics at the senior undergraduate or graduate level, this book is a follow-up to Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by the same authors, which was published in the series Scientific Computation in 2001.
Lehner said for many years, the folklore among physicists was that gravity could not be turbulent, adding that the belief was that gravity is described by a set of equations that are sufficiently different from fluid dynamics equations, such that there would not be turbulence under any circumstances.
Third, the use of LOMs has an established tradition in the study of fluid dynamics and atmospheric flows.