fluorescence


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fluo·res·cence

 (flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

fluorescence

(ˌflʊəˈrɛsəns)
n
1. (General Physics) physics
a. the emission of light or other radiation from atoms or molecules that are bombarded by particles, such as electrons, or by radiation from a separate source. The bombarding radiation produces excited atoms, molecules, or ions and these emit photons as they fall back to the ground state
b. such an emission of photons that ceases as soon as the bombarding radiation is discontinued
c. such an emission of photons for which the average lifetime of the excited atoms and molecules is less than about 10–8 seconds
2. (General Physics) the radiation emitted as a result of fluorescence. Compare phosphorescence
[C19: fluor + -escence (as in opalescence)]

fluo•res•cence

(flʊˈrɛs əns, flɔ-, floʊ-)

n.
1. the emission of radiation, esp. of visible light, by a substance during exposure to external radiation.
2. the property possessed by such a substance.
3. the radiation so produced.
[1852; fluor (spar) + (opal)escence]

fluo·res·cence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns)
1. The giving off of light by a substance when it is exposed to electromagnetic radiation, such as visible light or x-rays. Light is emitted only as long as the electromagnetic radiation continues to bombard the substance. Compare phosphorescence.
2. The light produced in this way.
Did You Know? Have you ever stood in a room illuminated by a "black light" and wondered why your white T-shirt, your shoelaces, and your teeth appear to glow? These objects appear so bright under ultraviolet light because they contain fluorescent materials that absorb the black light's ultraviolet rays (which are not visible to the human eye) and re-emit some of their energy as visible light. Therefore, these objects give off more visible light than is being shone on them, seemingly making something out of nothing. Many fabric whiteners leave fluorescent pigments behind in treated clothes; the clothes then look very bright because they absorb ultraviolet light from the environment and emit some of the absorbed energy as visible light.

fluorescence

The emission of light from an object which has been irradiated by light or other radiations. Energy is absorbed by the object and then re-radiated at a longer wavelength than the incident light.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fluorescence - light emitted during absorption of radiation of some other (invisible) wavelength
autofluorescence - self-induced fluorescence
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
phosphorescence - a fluorescence that persists after the bombarding radiation has ceased
Translations
إسْتِشْعاع، فَلْوَرَه
fluorescence
fluorescens
fluoreszkálás
flúrljóm
fluorescencia
florışıma

fluorescence

[flʊəˈresns] Nfluorescencia f

fluorescence

[ˌflʊəˈrɛsəns] nfluorescence f

fluorescence

nFluoreszenz f

fluorescence

[ˌflʊəˈrɛsns] nfluorescenza

fluorescent

(fluəˈresnt) adjective
giving off a certain kind of light. fluorescent light; fluorescent paint.
fluoˈrescence noun

fluor·es·cence

n. fluorescencia, propiedad de emisión de luminosidad de ciertas sustancias cuando son expuestas a cierto tipo de radiación, tal como los rayos-x.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toshiba has developed a system that performs fluorescence imaging of cell clusters during culturing in an incubator without using an objective lens.
com)-- Fluorescence is a technology that is now used routinely in life science research.
Summary: The reaction dynamics of Cry1Ab toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis with sodium, calcium and lead ions was studied by fluorescence quenching technique.
Fluorescence imaging plays an important role in life science research because fluorescence makes it possible to analyze where and how much a specific protein exists in cells or tissues.
Chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence techniques are useful to monitor in vivo the changes of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants.
Moreover, the GQDs emitted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence in the range of 800-850 nm with the excitation-dependent manner.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 9, 2014-Novadaq Technologies wins additional SPY fluorescence technology patent protection in the US
M2 PHARMA-December 9, 2014-Novadaq Technologies wins additional SPY fluorescence technology patent protection in the US
The system includes three fluorescent channels and brightfield to simplify fluorescence imaging for cell culture applications.
For their 'sugar computer' they use several components: One fluorescent dye and a so-called fluorescence quencher.
A potential new ESA satellite could use this fluorescence to track the health and productivity of vegetation worldwide.

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