fluoroacetate


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fluoroacetate

(ˌflʊərəʊˈæsɪˌteɪt)
n
a toxic chemical compound, C2H2FNaO2, occurring naturally in certain plants, and commonly used as rat poison
References in periodicals archive ?
By 2012 the programme had laid 150,000 baits - steel boxes of sodium fluoroacetate and poison.
Fluoroacetate actually occurs in nature in a variety of plants that grow in high-fluoride soils such as black tea leaves from India or Sri Lanka.
Sodium fluoroacetate (1080) occurs naturally in a number of Australian plants, however, it is a highly toxic substance that is used to kill pest animals such as rabbits, feral pigs, wild dogs and foxes.
Fluoroacetate poisons by shutting down the ATP producing citric acid cycle in the mitochondria of animalian cells.
In Japan, citrus red mite populations have developed resistance amitraz, benzoximate, binapacryl, chlorfenson, DDT, dicofol, dimethoate, fluoroacetate, oxydeprofos, phenkapton, and quinomethionate (Whalon et al.
Examples include fluoroacetate and fluoroacetamide, which inhibit the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and alkyl acids that inhibit the transport and/or oxidation of fats.
The first example of separation by using that kind of salts as an electrolyte component was demonstrated in [9] where water insoluble dyes were separated in acetonitrile with added 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium fluoroacetate (3.