fluoroacetate


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fluoroacetate

(ˌflʊərəʊˈæsɪˌteɪt)
n
a toxic chemical compound, C2H2FNaO2, occurring naturally in certain plants, and commonly used as rat poison
References in periodicals archive ?
Shafi and Khokhar (1986) used grain baits of sodium fluoroacetate (1080) in sugarcane fields and obtained 80-100% reduction in wild boar population.
One method would employ rodenticides such as sodium fluoroacetate, fluorcacetamide, zinc phosphide, norbormide, arsenious oxide, oe alpha-chloralose; however, it seemed that the rats had a built-in instinct against anything strange to them, "something called neophobia--new object avoidance" (Herbert 1989b: 128) which could make it difficult for the creatures to accept any new food put anywhere as baits especially if they could feel some ill-effects, in which case they would not touch it again.
By 2012 the programme had laid 150,000 baits - steel boxes of sodium fluoroacetate and poison.
Fluoroacetate actually occurs in nature in a variety of plants that grow in high-fluoride soils such as black tea leaves from India or Sri Lanka.
Hematological and biochemical profiles and histopathological evaluation of experimental intoxication by sodium fluoroacetate in cats.
Some rodenticides such as sodium fluoroacetate are too dangerous to use in open areas and so water- soluble anticoagulants, especially the sodium salts of warfarin and pival, are often used [1].
Sodium fluoroacetate (1080) occurs naturally in a number of Australian plants, however, it is a highly toxic substance that is used to kill pest animals such as rabbits, feral pigs, wild dogs and foxes.
Fluoroacetate poisons by shutting down the ATP producing citric acid cycle in the mitochondria of animalian cells.