flute


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flute

 (flo͞ot)
n.
1. Music
a. A high-pitched woodwind instrument consisting of a slender tube closed at one end with keys and finger holes on the side and an opening near the closed end across which the breath is blown. Also called transverse flute.
b. Any of various similar reedless woodwind instruments, such as the recorder.
c. An organ stop whose flue pipe produces a flutelike tone.
2.
a. Architecture A long, usually rounded groove incised as a decorative motif on the shaft of a column, for example.
b. A similar groove or furrow, as in a pleated ruffle of cloth or on a piece of furniture.
3. A tall narrow wineglass, often used for champagne.
v. flut·ed, flut·ing, flutes
v.tr.
1. Music To play (a tune) on a flute.
2. To produce in a flutelike tone.
3. To make flutes in (a column, for example).
v.intr.
1. Music To play a flute.
2. To sing, whistle, or speak with a flutelike tone.

[Middle English floute, from Old French flaute, from Old Provençal flaüt, perhaps a blend of flaujol, flageolet (from Vulgar Latin *flābeolum; see flageolet) and laut, lute; see lute1.]

flut′er n.
flut′ey, flut′y adj.

flute

(fluːt)
n
1. (Instruments) a wind instrument consisting of an open cylindrical tube of wood or metal having holes in the side stopped either by the fingers or by pads controlled by keys. The breath is directed across a mouth hole cut in the side, causing the air in the tube to vibrate. Range: about three octaves upwards from middle C
2. (Instruments) any pipe blown directly on the principle of a flue pipe, either by means of a mouth hole or through a fipple
3. (Architecture) architect a rounded shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column, pilaster, etc
4. a groove or furrow in cloth, etc
5. (Cookery) a tall narrow wineglass
6. anything shaped like a flute
vb
7. to produce or utter (sounds) in the manner or tone of a flute
8. (tr) to make grooves or furrows in
[C14: from Old French flahute, via Old Provençal, from Vulgar Latin flabeolum (unattested); perhaps also influenced by Old Provençal laut lute; see flageolet]
ˈfluteˌlike adj
ˈfluty, ˈflutey adj

flute

(flut)

n., v. flut•ed, flut•ing. n.
1. a wind instrument with a high range, consisting of a tube with a series of fingerholes or keys in which the wind is directed against a sharp edge, either directly, as in the modern transverse flute, or through a flue, as in the recorder.
2. one of a series of long, usu. rounded grooves, as on the shaft of a column.
3. any groove or furrow, as in a ruffle of cloth or on a piecrust.
4. a stemmed glass with a tall, slender bowl, used esp. for champagne.
v.i.
5. to produce flutelike sounds.
6. to play on a flute.
v.t.
7. to utter in flutelike tones.
8. to form flutes or furrows in.
[1350–1400; Middle English floute < Middle French flaüte, flahute, fleüte < Old Provençal < Vulgar Latin *flabeolum. See flageolet]
flut′er, n.
flute′like`, adj.

flute


Past participle: fluted
Gerund: fluting

Imperative
flute
flute
Present
I flute
you flute
he/she/it flutes
we flute
you flute
they flute
Preterite
I fluted
you fluted
he/she/it fluted
we fluted
you fluted
they fluted
Present Continuous
I am fluting
you are fluting
he/she/it is fluting
we are fluting
you are fluting
they are fluting
Present Perfect
I have fluted
you have fluted
he/she/it has fluted
we have fluted
you have fluted
they have fluted
Past Continuous
I was fluting
you were fluting
he/she/it was fluting
we were fluting
you were fluting
they were fluting
Past Perfect
I had fluted
you had fluted
he/she/it had fluted
we had fluted
you had fluted
they had fluted
Future
I will flute
you will flute
he/she/it will flute
we will flute
you will flute
they will flute
Future Perfect
I will have fluted
you will have fluted
he/she/it will have fluted
we will have fluted
you will have fluted
they will have fluted
Future Continuous
I will be fluting
you will be fluting
he/she/it will be fluting
we will be fluting
you will be fluting
they will be fluting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fluting
you have been fluting
he/she/it has been fluting
we have been fluting
you have been fluting
they have been fluting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fluting
you will have been fluting
he/she/it will have been fluting
we will have been fluting
you will have been fluting
they will have been fluting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fluting
you had been fluting
he/she/it had been fluting
we had been fluting
you had been fluting
they had been fluting
Conditional
I would flute
you would flute
he/she/it would flute
we would flute
you would flute
they would flute
Past Conditional
I would have fluted
you would have fluted
he/she/it would have fluted
we would have fluted
you would have fluted
they would have fluted

flute

To make a decorative indented edging, e.g. around a pie crust.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flute - a high-pitched woodwind instrumentflute - a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender tube closed at one end with finger holes on one end and an opening near the closed end across which the breath is blown
fife - a small high-pitched flute similar to a piccolo; has a shrill tone and is used chiefly to accompany drums in a marching band
nose flute - a flute that is played by blowing through the nostrils (used in some Asian countries)
piccolo - a small flute; pitched an octave above the standard flute
woodwind, woodwind instrument, wood - any wind instrument other than the brass instruments
2.flute - a tall narrow wineglassflute - a tall narrow wineglass    
wineglass - a glass that has a stem and in which wine is served
3.flute - a groove or furrow in cloth etc (particularly a shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column)flute - a groove or furrow in cloth etc (particularly a shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column)
groove, channel - a long narrow furrow cut either by a natural process (such as erosion) or by a tool (as e.g. a groove in a phonograph record)
Verb1.flute - form flutes in
crimp, pinch - make ridges into by pinching together

flute

noun
Related words
fear aulophobia
Translations
فُلُوتمِزْمار ، ناي
flétna
fløjte
huilu
flauta
fuvola
flauta
フルート
플루트
tibia
flauta
flaut
flauta
flavta
flöjttvärflöjt
ขลุ่ย
ống sáo

flute

[fluːt] Nflauta f; (in Andes, S. Cone) (= bamboo) → quena f

flute

[ˈfluːt] nflûte f
I play the flute → Je joue de la flûte.

flute

n
(Mus) → Querflöte f; (= organ stop)Flötenregister nt
flute (glass)Flöte f
vt column, pillarkannelieren
vi (person, voice)flöten

flute

[fluːt] nflauto

flute

(fluːt) noun
a type of high-pitched woodwind musical instrument.
flutistflautist

flute

فُلُوت flétna fløjte Flöte φλάουτο flauta huilu flûte flauta flauto フルート 플루트 fluit fløyte flet flauta флейта tvärflöjt ขลุ่ย flüt ống sáo 长笛
References in classic literature ?
But that this is evidently absurd is clear from other arts and sciences; for with respect to musicians who play on the flute together, the best flute is not given to him who is of the best family, for he will play never the better for that, but the best instrument ought to be given to him who is the best artist.
The old woman counselled her to go to the mill-pond the next full moon and play upon a golden flute, and then to lay the flute on the bank.
George Morton played on the German flute in a manner that vibrated on her nerves with an exquisite thrill that she often strove to conquer, and yet ever loved to indulge.
A FISHERMAN skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore.
Epic poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic: poetry, and the music of the flute and of the lyre in most of their forms, are all in their general conception modes of imitation.
In pursuance of this resolution, he now drew a little table to his bedside, and arranging the light and a small oblong music-book to the best advantage, took his flute from its box, and began to play most mournfully.
The Master, upon this, put his hand underneath the skirts of his coat, and brought out his flute in three pieces, which he screwed together, and began immediately to play.
Really, Fred, I wish you would leave off playing the flute.
The money with which he bought the bulbs was borrowed, and now he left Leyden to make the tour of Europe burdened already with debt, with one guinea in his pocket, and one clean shirt and a flute as his luggage.
I saw a little table in the great mosaic school in Florence--a little trifle of a centre table--whose top was made of some sort of precious polished stone, and in the stone was inlaid the figure of a flute, with bell-mouth and a mazy complication of keys.
There was nobody inside but a miserable shoeless criminal, who had been taken up for playing the flute, and who, the offence against society having been clearly proved, had been very properly committed by Mr.
Her cousin, Cassandra Otway, for example, had a very fine taste in music, and he had charming recollections of her in a light fantastic attitude, playing the flute in the morning-room at Stogdon House.