dovecote

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dove·cote

 (dŭv′kōt′, -kŏt′) also dove·cot (-kŏt′)
n.
A compartmental structure, often raised on a pole, for housing domesticated pigeons.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dovecote

(ˈdʌvˌkəʊt) or

dovecot

n
(Architecture) a structure for housing pigeons, often raised on a pole or set on a wall, containing compartments for the birds to roost and lay eggs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dove•cote

(ˈdʌvˌkoʊt)

also dove•cot

(-kɒt)

n.
a structure, usu. at a height above the ground, for housing domestic pigeons.
[1375–1425]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dovecote - a birdhouse for pigeonsdovecote - a birdhouse for pigeons    
birdhouse - a shelter for birds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dovecote

[ˈdʌvkɒt] Npalomar m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dovecote

[ˈdʌvkəʊt] dovecot [ˈdʌvkɒt] npigeonnier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dovecote

[ˈdʌvˌkəʊt] ncolombaia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Last week, an Indian parliamentary panel fluttered the dovecotes in Thimphu - Bhutan's idyllic capital - by recommending New Delhi encourage Bhutan to deploy more soldiers in the disputed Doklam area, where a year ago several hundred Indian and Chinese soldiers stood eyeball-to-eyeball, raising real fears of bloodshed.
It is useless to explain in detail how the education ministry has fluttered the dovecotes. The basic problem is that ministry officials have the whip in hand over the college entrance exam instead of school authorities.