flying buttress


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flying buttress

n.
An arched masonry support serving to bear thrust, as from a vaulted ceiling, away from a main structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also called arc-boutant.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flying buttress

n
(Architecture) a buttress supporting a wall or other structure by an arch or part of an arch that transmits the thrust outwards and downwards. Also called: arc-boutant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fly′ing but′tress


n.
an arch or segment of an arch projecting from a wall and transmitting the thrust of a roof or vault outward and downward to a solid buttress or pier.
[1660–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flying buttress - a buttress that stands apart from the main structure and connected to it by an archflying buttress - a buttress that stands apart from the main structure and connected to it by an arch
buttress, buttressing - a support usually of stone or brick; supports the wall of a building
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
vzpěrný oblouk
luchtboog

flying buttress

n (Archit) → arco rampante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Behind the Bastille there were twenty hovels clustered round the curious sculptures of the Croix-Faubin and the flying buttresses of the Abbey of Saint- Antoine des Champs; then Popincourt, lost amid wheat fields; then la Courtille, a merry village of wine-shops; the hamlet of Saint-Laurent with its church whose bell tower, from afar, seemed to add itself to the pointed towers of the Porte Saint- Martin; the Faubourg Saint-Denis, with the vast enclosure of Saint-Ladre; beyond the Montmartre Gate, the Grange- Batelière, encircled with white walls; behind it, with its chalky slopes, Montmartre, which had then almost as many churches as windmills, and which has kept only the windmills, for society no longer demands anything but bread for the body.
Right from the beginning, Winston Churchill imagined a "United States of Europe", which the United Kingdom would support from the outside like a flying buttress. "France and Germany must take the lead together," he had said in 1946, while Britain and America "must be the friends and sponsors of the new Europe."
Finished around 1345, it is one of the first buildings in the world to use the flying buttress to distribute stress and weight.
Nonetheless, he highlights the great achievements of medieval man, such as "architectural inventions, including the flying buttress that made it possible for the first time to build very tall buildings with thin walls and large windows, thus prompting major achievements in stained glass." He notes that thirteenth century European artists, Christian all of them, were "the first to use oil paint and to put their work on stretched canvas rather than on wood or plaster."
Star of the Vaulting & Buttresses chapter, the flying buttress is a free-standing support attached by an arch to transfer thrust.
It proved to be a sort of airy chamber in the underside of a flying buttress, and it opened downward into empty space.
A flying buttress provides external support to a Gothic building.
The mainstream of American architecture expressed satisfaction with the results, viewing Howells and Hood's Gothic tower with its lantern and flying buttress crown as an expression of the best aspirations of American business and building culture.
a ticket home extra money and a bank account is what the guide book lists it also says cafe flying buttress natural history museum promenade cotton towels botanical gardens acropolis ice
Add to that the instrument's heavy double-walled construction, thick and rigidly ribbed soundboard, separate upper and lower guides, and flying buttress braces, and one can only conclude that the inventor of this technology had set out to rethink fundamentally the engineering of the harpsichord.
The same is true for the horizontal loom with treadle and the spinning wheel; stone castlery and the combining of pointed arch, ribbed vault, and flying buttress into Gothic structures; the gunpowder cannon; ships with added masts, sails, and a mariner's compass; presses, papers, and inks variously employed; and the mechanical clock, the appearance of which may "in the advance of Europe to the forefront of world technology [be viewed as] a decisive moment" (210).
The interior and its familiar "flying buttress" console with a very simple but high quality control arrangement is exceptional.