flying saucer


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flying saucer

n.
An unidentified flying object of presumed extraterrestrial origin, typically described as a luminous moving disk.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flying saucer

n
(Astronautics) any disc-shaped flying object alleged to come from outer space
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fly′ing sau′cer


n.
any of various disk-shaped objects reportedly seen flying and alleged to come from outer space; UFO.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flying saucer - an (apparently) flying object whose nature is unknownflying saucer - an (apparently) flying object whose nature is unknown; especially those considered to have extraterrestrial origins
fantasm, phantasm, phantasma, phantom, shadow, apparition - something existing in perception only; "a ghostly apparition at midnight"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَحْن طائِر
létající talíř
flyvende tallerken
fljúgandi diskur
leteči krožnik

flying saucer

ndisco volante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fly2

(flai) past tense flew (fluː) : past participle flown (floun) verb
1. to (make something) go through the air on wings etc or in an aeroplane. The pilot flew (the plane) across the sea.
2. to run away (from). He flew (the country).
3. (of time) to pass quickly. The days flew past.
ˈflyer, ˈflier noun
1. a person who flies an aeroplane etc or is in one.
2. a sheet of paper advertising a product, event etc. handing out flyers to passers-by.
flying saucer
a strange flying object thought possibly to come from another planet.
flying visit
a very short, often unexpected, visit. She paid her mother a flying visit.
frequent flyer/flier noun
a passenger who flies frequently in the same airline and receives bonuses accordingly.
ˈflyleaf noun
a blank page at the beginning or end of a book.
ˈflyover noun
a road etc which is built up so as to cross above another. a flyover across the motorway.
fly in the face of
to oppose or defy; to treat with contempt. He flew in the face of danger.
fly into
suddenly to get into (a rage, a temper etc).
fly off the handle
to lose one's temper.
get off to a flying start
to have a very successful beginning. Our new shop has got off to a flying start.
let fly (often with at)
to throw, shoot or send out violently. He let fly (an arrow) at the target.
send (someone/something) flying
to hit or knock someone or something so that he or it falls down or falls backwards. She hit him and sent him flying.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leftover adobo is turned into adobo flying saucer sandwich.
PPG has donated PPG CORAFLON ADS (air-dry system) coatings, including primer, metallic topcoat and clearcoat, to refurbish the flying saucer that has been a fixture in downtown Mars, Pennsylvania, since the early 1980s.
I said before that nothing would surprise me, a flying saucer landing on the pitch at half time, Lord Lucan emerging from the dugout or, better still, a manager who both owner and supporters could get behind and agree on.
1947: The series of "flying saucer"stories started when a pilot, Kenneth Arnold, reported seeing nine disc-shaped objects over Mount Rainier, Washington.
The experts keep saying it was a meteorite, but one Shropshire man who saw it and who says he knows about such things is convinced it was a flying saucer.
These recommendations and findings are provided by the Europe Nostra cultural heritage organization and the European Investment Bank (EIB) in a study on the future of the so-called "flying saucer" of Buzludzha Peak.
"My book features a scene set in modern times in which an RAF Eurofighter Typhoon shoots down a flying saucer with cannon fire."
Bringing a bit of French history, wit and of course a comedic illustration (showcasing a flying saucer hovering over a vineyard), Grahm was able to play down the stereotypes of pretension surrounding French and French-inspired wines.
A felt sideways flying saucer head warmer is the only way to go TV's Claudia Winkleman on the return of the beret as a fashion must-have
"UFO Became A Mum" (September 28, 1968): "A flying saucer which gave birth over Willenhall has been reported to the Unidentified Flying Object Information Centre of Mr Brian Leathley-Andrew.
"Yes, you have my flying saucer in there," she nodded to the rusted landscape beyond the bars of the gate.
STUDENT HOAX THE great flying saucer hoax in 1967 saw Farnborough Technical College students Chris Southall and David Harrison creating their own alien craft for a rag-week stunt.