necrosis

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ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
There was dilatation and congestion of central vein, degeneration, focal necrosis in hepatocytes of hepatic cord.
Nonspecific (reactive) hepatitis was defined as a nonspecific inflammatory process with focal necrosis, granulocytic or lymphocytic inflammation, Kupffer cell proliferation, and at least some acute or chronic inflammatory cells in the portal tract.
Viral replication in the epidermis causing focal necrosis and ballooning degeneration has been attributed to be the cause of blistering in CKG.13 The vesicular lesions have been well documented in infants,4,11,13 but the reports in adults are not many.
On muscle biopsy, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed the presence of hypercontractive fibers, scattered small focal necrosis, and regeneration.
Our case was diagnosed as intestinal EATL type 2, because of the monomorphic and small appearance of tumor cells, absence of inflammatory background, positive staining for CD3, CD8, and CD56, and lack of celiac disease findings, although focal necrosis was seen in some areas.
On histopathological examination, liver revealed diffuse congestion, vacuolar degeneration and focal necrosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells were seen.
After 6 days, both envenomed groups presented partial loss of muscle fibers associated with disorganization of the bundles and focal necrosis with mononuclear cells (macrophages) and fibroblasts.
High mitotic activity and focal necrosis with hemorrhage were also noted in the mass (Figure 3(b)).
Using a modified grading method, the severity of the necroinflammatory process and fibrosis was determined by scoring periportal necrosis with or without bridging necrosis (0-10), intralobular degeneration and focal necrosis (0-4), portal inflammation (0-4), and fibrosis (0-6).
D-GaIN caused panlobular focal necrosis and periportal inflammation, which was accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate of predominantly polymorph nuclear cells with a few lymphocytes and swollen macrophages (Robert et al., 1999).
FNAC showed focal necrosis against hemorrhagic background without demonstrable acid fast bacillus (AFB).