focal

(redirected from focal zone)
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fo·cal

 (fō′kəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a focus.
2. Placed at or measured from a focus.

fo′cal·ly adv.

focal

(ˈfəʊkəl)
adj
1. (General Physics) of or relating to a focus
2. (General Physics) situated at, passing through, or measured from the focus
ˈfocally adv

fo•cal

(ˈfoʊ kəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or at a focus.
[1685–95]
fo′cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.focal - having or localized centrally at a focus; "focal point"; "focal infection"
central - in or near a center or constituting a center; the inner area; "a central position"
2.focal - of or relating to a focus; "focal length"
Translations
بُؤْري
ohniskový
fokuserende
brennidepils-; skerpu-
ohniskový
odak noktasına ait

focal

[ˈfəʊkəl]
A. ADJ (Tech) → focal
B. CPD focal distance Ndistancia f focal
focal plane Nplano m focal
focal point Npunto m focal (fig) → centro m de atención

focal

[ˈfəʊkəl] adj [length, plane] → focal(e)focal point n
(= key place) → point m de convergence
(= key feature) → attraction f, point m d'attraction
the focal point of the show this year → l'attraction du spectacle cette année
(= key issue) [meeting, discussions] → point m central
[battle, conflict] → point m focal

focal

adj (fig)im Brennpunkt (stehend), fokal (geh)

focal

:
focal length
nBrennweite f
focal plane
nBrennebene f
focal point
n (lit, fig)Brennpunkt m; his family is the focal of his lifeseine Familie ist der Mittelpunkt seines Lebens, sein ganzes Leben dreht sich um seine Familie

focal

[ˈfəʊkl] adj (Tech) → focale

focus

(ˈfoukəs) plurals ˈfocuses ~foci (ˈfousai) noun
1. the point at which rays of light meet after passing through a lens.
2. a point to which light, a look, attention etc is directed. She was the focus of everyone's attention.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈfocus(s)ed
1. to adjust (a camera, binoculars etc) in order to get a clear picture. Remember to focus the camera / the picture before taking the photograph.
2. to direct (attention etc) to one point. The accident focussed public attention on the danger.
ˈfocal adjective
in/out of focus
giving or not giving a clear picture. These photographs are out of focus.

fo·cal

a. focal, rel. a un foco.

focal

adj focal
References in periodicals archive ?
These lenses consist of a singular focal zone and will, therefore, only provide correction of vision at one distance.
By increasing the temperature above 43-67[degrees]C within a few seconds, HIFU induces thermal lesions in the focal zone [3].
Create a focal zone THE best place to set your symmetrical vignette is against the largest unbroken wall - the perfect amount of space for your bedhead in the bedroom or, as shown here, your sofa in the living room.
Create a focal zone THE best place to set your symmetrical vignette is against the largest unbroken wall - the perfect amount of space for your bedhead in the bedroom or, as Create a focal zone THE best place to set your symmetrical vignette is against the largest unbroken wall - the perfect amount of space for your bedhead in the bedroom or, as shown here, your sofa in the living room.
The transducer's focal point was 2-3 cm with a 5cm focal zone. The globes were examined in a sagittal plane as standard described models in both right and left side of the body.
The plant is located in the center of the expected focal zone of a magnitude-8 earthquake in the Tokai region that scientists are predicting.
and Horalek, J.: 2000, Refined locations of the swarm earthquakes in the Novy Kostel focal zone and spatial distribution of the January 1997 swarm in Western Bohemia, Czech Republic.
Occasionally, even in normal subjects, the wall cannot be adequately measured, which may simply be due to the superficially located gallbladder being out of the focal zone of the transducer, but this can be corrected by adjusting the focal zone and gain.
The Dornier HM3 lithotripter (Dornier Medizintechnik GmbH, Germering, Germany) was first introduced to the United States in the early 1980s.[sup.1] Since then, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has revolutionized the treatment of stone disease.[sup.2,3] Over the past 20 years, there have been ongoing efforts to improve lithotripter equipment; since the Dornier HM3, there have been over 40 lithotripters developed.[sup.4,5] Newer lithotripters use narrower focal zones allowing for the theoretical benefits of decrease pain and collateral trauma.[sup.4,7] These theoretical benefits, however, may have come at the expense of decreased efficacy, perhaps because targeting is more difficult with a smaller focal zone.[sup.4,5]