router

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rout·er 1

 (rou′tər)
n.
One that routs, especially a machine tool that mills out the surface of metal or wood.

rout·er 2

 (ro͞o′tər, rou′-)
n.
1. One that routes, especially one who prepares shipments for distribution and delivery.
2. (rou′tər) Computers
a. A device in a network that handles message transfers between computers.
b. See gateway.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

router

(ˈraʊtə)
n
(Tools) any of various tools or machines for hollowing out, cutting grooves, etc

router

(ˈruːtə)
n
(Computer Science) computing a device that allows packets of data to be moved efficiently between two points on a network
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rout•er

(ˈraʊ tər)

n.
1. any of various tools or machines for routing, hollowing out, or furrowing.
2. Also called rout′er plane`. a plane for cutting interior angles, as at the bottom of a groove.
[1840–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.router - a worker who routes shipments for distribution and delivery
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
2.router - (computer science) a device that forwards data packets between computer networks
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
3.router - a power tool with a shaped cutter; used in carpentry for cutting grooves
power tool - a tool driven by a motor
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
reititin
routeurdéfonçeuserooter
beinir
ルータ
라우터

router

[ˈraʊtər ˈruːtər] nrouteur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

router

n (Comput) → Router m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Exploiting smart e-health gateways at the edge of healthcare Internet-ofthings: a fog computing approach.
Those network connections between the edge computing resources and the central data centre-based cloud form what has become known as the fog computing infrastructure (an article for another time!).
The first is to gather new data, such as sentiment information from social channels, weather inputs, economic performance or information from new IoT or fog computing sensors that can provide insights into customer demand.
Developing appropriate security solutions, from firewalls to private cloud environments, FOG computing and beyond will address these concerns, but we must also promote the benefits that greater data sharing can bring.
(Coventry and Branley, 2018) Fog computing represents a judicious way out for healthcare services by furthering perpetual intensive care of remote patient health and decreasing the delay and communication expense that constitutes a tremendous priority of cloud computing.
Fog computing, considered a superset of edge computing used to bridge the traditional operations (OT) world with enterprise IT, is also starting to take root, cited by only 20 percent of respondents.
Dynamic (re)configuration of distributed components is not an ordinary problem [2], and the growth of cloud computing in the recent years as well as its evolution such as Fog computing have created the issue more obvious.
In addition, the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) has led to increases in the number of Edge and Fog computing systems (Margen 2013 and Lopez et al.
It was 2012 when the concept of edge computing as introduced and later was termed as fog computing as a quintessential archetype to assist resource constrained IoT devices [3].