food additive


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food additive

n
(Cookery) any of various natural or synthetic substances, such as salt, monosodium glutamate, or citric acid, used in the commercial processing of food as preservatives, antioxidants, emulsifiers, etc, in order to preserve or add flavour, colour, or texture to processed food
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.food additive - an additive to food intended to improve its flavor or appearance or shelf-lifefood additive - an additive to food intended to improve its flavor or appearance or shelf-life
additive - something added to enhance food or gasoline or paint or medicine
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References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps most disappointingly, elimination of the FCN program would not save any resources at FDA, assuming that some number of substances formerly eligible for review as FCNs are submitted for review as Food Additive Petitions.
The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) in June appointed of Laura Tarantino director of CFSAN's Office of Food Additive Safety (OFAS).
It is used as a food additive to gel, thicken, and stabilize foods.
Food additives are regulated at the European Union by a directive which defines a food additive - except a colour or sweetener - as any substance with or without nutritional value.
Answer: As storage as it may seem, the section of the FDA that has jurisdiction over these types of materials is the Office of Food Additive Safety because these materials are considered a contact "food additive." However, they do not have any listing of materials that have been approved for food contact.
food additive intake assessment, risks and benefits of food additives, consumer attitudes to food additives, to those relating to specific functional groups of additives, e.g.
John's wort as a food additive. Nor has the FDA or any manufacturer declared it to be Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS).
A case in point is this clause in the 1960 Food Additive Amendment to the Food and Drug Act which stipulates that any additive found to cause cancer in laboratory animals cannot be used in foods.
The detailed report represents new information on: products and markets; applications markets; marketing; competitive intelligence; technology; environmental, legislative and regulatory trends; ad food additive producers.
As currently written, the preamble sets a broad interpretation on what is considered a food additive, saying all colorants used in packaging that could possibly migrate to food fall under the definition.
The Food Additives Amendment exempted two groups of substances from the food additive regulation process.

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