foolhardy


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Related to foolhardy: advantageous

fool·har·dy

 (fo͞ol′här′dē)
adj. fool·har·di·er, fool·har·di·est
Unwisely bold or venturesome; rash. See Synonyms at reckless.

[Middle English folhardi, from Old French fol hardi : fol, fool; see fool + hardi, bold; see hardy1.]

fool′har′di·ly adv.
fool′har′di·ness n.

foolhardy

(ˈfuːlˌhɑːdɪ)
adj, -hardier or -hardiest
heedlessly rash or adventurous
[C13: from Old French fol hardi, from fol foolish + hardi bold]
ˈfoolˌhardily adv
ˈfoolˌhardiness n

fool•har•dy

(ˈfulˌhɑr di)

adj. -di•er, -di•est.
recklessly or thoughtlessly bold.
[1175–1225; Middle English folhardy < Old French fol hardi. See fool1, hardy]
fool′har`di•ly, adv.
fool′har`di•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.foolhardy - marked by defiant disregard for danger or consequences; "foolhardy enough to try to seize the gun from the hijacker"; "became the fiercest and most reckless of partisans"-Macaulay; "a reckless driver"; "a rash attempt to climb Mount Everest"
bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"

foolhardy

foolhardy

adjective
Translations
مُتَهَوِّر، يُجازِف بِحَماقَه
šíleně odvážnýztřeštěný
dumdristig
fífldjarfur
delicesine cesur

foolhardy

[ˈfuːlˌhɑːdɪ] ADJ (= rash) → temerario

foolhardy

[ˈfuːlhɑːrdi] adj (= reckless) → téméraire, imprudent(e)

foolhardy

adjtollkühn

foolhardy

[ˈfuːlˌhɑːdɪ] adj (rash) → avventato/a, imprudente

fool

(fuːl) noun
a person without sense or intelligence. He is such a fool he never knows what to do.
verb
1. to deceive. She completely fooled me with her story.
2. (often with about or around) to act like a fool or playfully. Stop fooling about!
ˈfoolish adjective
1. having no sense. He is a foolish young man.
2. ridiculous. He looked very foolish.
ˈfoolishly adverb
ˈfoolishness noun
ˈfoolhardy adjective
taking foolish risks; rash. He made a foolhardy attempt to climb the mountain in winter.
ˈfoolhardiness noun
ˈfoolproof adjective
unable to go wrong. His new plan seems completely foolproof.
make a fool of
to make (someone) appear ridiculous or stupid. He made a real fool of her by promising to marry her and then leaving her when he had spent all her money.
make a fool of oneself
to act in such a way that people consider one ridiculous or stupid. She made a fool of herself at the party.
play the fool
to act in a foolish manner, especially with the intention of amusing other people. He always played the fool when the teacher left the classroom.
References in classic literature ?
I shall break my neck yet with some such foolhardy performance, for warnings never seem to have any lasting effect on me.
The pupils won- dered if this foolhardy boy had lost his mind.
But Umslopogaas did not sleep, for he had determined that he would fetch the cub which Nada had desired, and, being young and foolhardy, he did not think of the danger which he would bring upon himself and all of us.
Some intrepid larches waved green pennons in the very midst of the turbulent water, here and there a veteran lay with his many-summered head abased in the rocky course of the stream, and here was a young foolhardy beech that had climbed within a dozen yards of the rampart.
And now I began to feel that I was neglecting my business, that since I had been so foolhardy as to come ashore with these desperadoes, the least I could do was to overhear them at their councils, and that my plain and obvious duty was to draw as close as I could manage, under the favourable ambush of the crouching trees.
What he had done was so amazing, so foolhardy, that no trained electrician could have thought of it.
But this foolhardy deed was his undoing, for just as the arrow left the string, the good yew bow that had never before failed him snapped in twain.
Fogg; his eagerness to reach distant countries; the pretext of an eccentric and foolhardy bet--all confirmed Fix in his theory.
That second start was the most foolhardy thing I ever did.
D'Artagnan was not one of those foolhardy men who seek a ridiculous death in order that it may be said of them that they did not retreat a single step.
Louvieres sprang forward to snatch his sword, which stood against a chair in a corner of the room; but a glance from the worthy Broussel, who in the midst of It all did not lose his presence of mind, checked this foolhardy action of despair.
Why, what a foolhardy, self-conceited coxcomb he is