foot fault


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foot fault

n. Sports
A fault against the server, as in tennis, called for failure to keep both feet behind the baseline.

foot fault

or

footfault

n
(Tennis) tennis a fault that occurs when the server fails to keep both feet behind the baseline until he has served

foot′ fault`


n.
the failure of the server in tennis, volleyball, etc., to keep both feet behind the base line until the ball is hit or to keep at least one foot on the ground while hitting the ball.
[1885–90]
foot′fault`, v.i.

foot fault

An illegal move. The server is on or over the base line, or walks or runs while serving.
Translations

foot fault

n (Tennis) → fallo di piede
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References in periodicals archive ?
well Duncan's probably a foot fault. An unforced error."
The 23-time Grand Slam winner (right) went 5-1 up in the third set against Karolina Pliskova but after a foot fault on her first serve for the victory, she landed awkwardly on her left ankle.
But it was not to be, a foot fault and a rolled ankle saw Williams' match unravel.
Williams had her first match point at 5-1 but, after being called for a foot fault on what appeared to be an ace, she jarred her left ankle and did not win another point on serve during the match.
Mathews was on 30, and Karunaratne on 36 after being given a life on 33 when Neil Wagner had him caught at mid-wicket, only to have the delivery ruled a no-ball due to a foot fault.
Karunaratne was given a life on 33 when Neil Wagner had him caught at mid-wicket, only to have the delivery ruled a no-ball due to a foot fault.
The Aussie was pulled up for a foot fault in his win over Robin Haase but accepted the explanation with a smile.
The 30-year-old Italian had by now started a running dispute with umpire James Keothavong over challenges and a couple of foot fault calls, and quickly went a break down at the start of the third set.
Foot fault for Pedro Caixinha can't control his anger at Ibrox as Josh Windass takes a clattering and he spots that his luminous boots are verging on green.
To assess the functional recovery after stroke in the four different groups, the modified Neurological Severity Score (mNSS score) and the Foot Fault test were performed at 1 d before and 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, and 14 d after stroke induction [25, 26].
At one such moment, with Williams serving at deuce after a double-fault, she was called for a foot fault, erasing what would have been a 121 mph ace.
In order to analyze the complete step sequence, analysis of the foot fault scoring system was modified as follows: starting with the limb that began the walk, consecutive steps were all estimated.