footedness


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Noun1.footedness - the property of favoring one foot over the other (as in kicking a ball)
asymmetry, dissymmetry, imbalance - (mathematics) a lack of symmetry
References in periodicals archive ?
"There was a need for nimble footedness in identifying the changes taking place in society in order to chalk out the future of India," Reddy said.
There is no shortcut available, footedness and hair whorl direction notwithstanding.
Footedness has been suggested to be an influencing factor in foot pathology (18,19) and callus formation (20), where footedness has been described as the tendency to prefer the use of a consistent foot in performing voluntary motor acts.
Conformations such as heel contraction, underrun heels, club footedness, or medial/lateral hoof flaring will become more noticeable and perhaps develop into a cause for lameness if not addressed earlier in his life.
"Given the lead and nimble footedness of standard banks, Islamic banks need to be equipped with a range of products and services.
The Taoiseach who has his hand on the pulse of the people and does Empathy with a capital E seems to have abandoned his sure footedness when dealing with this festering legacy from our murky past.
This contradiction necessitates further study and clarification of the problem of strength asymmetry in soccer players, as a result of pre-existing limb preference (footedness).
The Chinese, another of my favourite haunts that looks straight out of a war zone, has been rendered inaccessible -- you need the nimble- footedness of a trapeze artiste to reach it.
Rather, it has all the flat footedness and tone deafness of executives who can only see what they want to see without regard for how it's going to play out in the political arena and in the long term.
Creaking limbs are no match for the fleet footedness of heels fuelled by panic.
Handedness, footedness, eyedness and eardness are the peripheral indicators of hemispheric lateralization.
In a recent survey of footedness studies, Canadian psychologist Michael Peters of the University of Guelph, Ontario, finds about one-half of left-handers are right-footed.