footlights


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foot·lights

 (fo͝ot′līts′)
pl.n.
1. Lights placed in a row along the front of a stage floor.
2. The theater as a profession.

footlights

(ˈfʊtˌlaɪts)
pl n
1. (Theatre) lights set in a row along the front of the stage floor and shielded on the audience side
2. (Theatre) informal the acting profession; the stage

footlights

A row of lights at the front of the stage, necessary in the past to counter the heavy shadows cast by overhead lighting on actors' faces.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.footlights - theater light at the front of a stage that illuminate the set and actorsfootlights - theater light at the front of a stage that illuminate the set and actors
forestage, proscenium, apron - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)
theater light - any of various lights used in a theater
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations

footlights

[ˈfʊtlaɪts] NPL (in theatre) → candilejas fpl

footlights

[ˈfʊtlaɪts] nplrampe f

footlights

pl (Theat) → Rampenlicht nt; the lure of the footlights (fig)die Anziehungskraft der Bühne or der Bretter

footlights

[ˈfʊtˌlaɪts] npl (in theatre) → luci fpl della ribalta
References in classic literature ?
To be sure he had a mustache, which in those days devoted a man to wickedness, but by day it was a blond mustache, quite flaxen, in fact, and not at all the dark and deadly thing it was behind the footlights at night.
It all goes by magic." And snatching a chance piece of billiard chalk from his pocket, he ran it across the hall floor, half-way between the front door and the staircase, to mark the line of the footlights.
She was a sprightly young woman, very smart and merry and decorously voluptuous, and of that fascinating prettiness that wins the hearts of boys and storms the footlights. One of her characteristics soothed the heart of Rosalind.
When she came to know writers it was like adventuring upon a stage which till then she had known only from the other side of the footlights. She saw them dramatically, and really seemed herself to live a larger life because she entertained them and visited them in their fastnesses.
I wanted to cross the footlights and help the slim-waisted Armand in the frilled shirt to convince her that there was still loyalty and devotion in the world.
There was little of that sort of customary thing where the tenor and the soprano stand down by the footlights, warbling, with blended voices, and keep holding out their arms toward each other and drawing them back and spreading both hands over first one breast and then the other with a shake and a pressure--no, it was every rioter for himself and no blending.
In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.
The fact is, the sight of the congregation, when I get into the pulpit, has the same effect upon me that the sight of the footlights has on an actor.
"Well, bonne chance!" she added, giving Vronsky one finger of the hand in which she held her fan, and with a shrug of her shoulders she twitched down the bodice of her gown that had worked up, so as to be duly naked as she moved forward towards the footlights into the light of the gas, and the sight of all eyes.
He was treated with a solemn respect accorded in the irreverent West only to the monarchs of the stage, and he accepted the profound homage with a sustained dignity seen nowhere else but behind the footlights and in the condensed falseness of some grossly tragic situation.
WELL, all day him and the king was hard at it, rigging up a stage and a curtain and a row of candles for footlights; and that night the house was jam full of men in no time.
Abandoning his position, clearing the footlights without the aid of his wings, and, clambering up to the right-hand gallery, he fell at the feet of one of the spectators, crying, "Ah, my master!