foppery


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Related to foppery: foppish

fop·per·y

 (fŏp′ə-rē)
n. pl. fop·per·ies
1. Foolish quality or action.
2. The dress or manner of a fop.

foppery

(ˈfɒpərɪ)
n, pl -peries
the clothes, affectations, obsessions, etc, of or befitting a fop

fop•per•y

(ˈfɒp ə ri)

n., pl. -per•ies.
1. the clothes, manners, actions, etc., of a fop.
2. something foppish.
[1540–50]
References in classic literature ?
There was certainly no harm in his travelling sixteen miles twice over on such an errand; but there was an air of foppery and nonsense in it which she could not approve.
The interval had not entirely been bestowed in holding council with his confederates, for De Bracy had found leisure to decorate his person with all the foppery of the times.
Robson, the scorner of the female sex, was not above the foppery of stays.
Besides, a man who has no foppery at twenty will be a slatternly, dirty-collar, unbrushed-coat man at forty.
And there was a touch of foppery about him, in the enormous white tie and the much-cherished whiskers of the fifties, which was only redeemed by that other touch of devilry that he had shown me in the corridor.
Miss Trix is equal to that sort of thing, but it is n't like Tom, for with all his foppery he is a good fellow at heart."
"I don't say it's the sort of nose one would wear out of mere foppery," he admitted.
How often I'll hear his voice, usually on the golf course ("never up, never in") or watching the golf on TV ("och, ah could have sunk that for God's sake") or when I'm in the car, stuck in traffic ("will ye look at this idiot?") or I'm in some London ponce shop, paying way over the odds for an outrageous piece of foppery ("FOR A BLOODY SHIRT, JOHN?
She deservedly won a Golden Globe for her outstanding performance supported by Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone as rivals for friendship and more within the rivalry, intrigue and foppery of the court.
Talking, never listening, hectoring hardly hidden, All-knowing, all-mighty, an oracle beyond restraint His is the era of want and worry Of lean shadows and swindled dreams Chronically hard of seeing The Emperor romps around in majestic indifference His ward bursting with designer robes His mocking foppery, an affront to the people's rags Widows wail, orphans lament The people cry from their lowly roosts Stanza V of 'June 12 and Its Children' centers on 'The Right Honourables' which is essentially a lament of the disappointment that parliamentarians had come to epitomize since Nigeria's return to governance via the three arms.
In The Merchant of Venice, Shylock warns his daughter to shun the pre-Lenten carnival masquerade with its "shallow foppery" and "feasting" (2.5.36-38); but Jessica uses the opportunity to disguise herself as a boy, steal money from her father, and run away with her Christian lover, Lorenzo.