forb


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forb

 (fôrb)
n.
A broad-leaved herb other than a grass, especially one growing in a field, prairie, or meadow.

[From Greek phorbē, fodder, from pherbein, to graze.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

forb

(fɔːb)
n
(Plants) any herbaceous plant that is not a grass
[C20: from Greek phorbē food, from pherbein to graze]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

forb

(fɔrb)

n.
any herbaceous plant that is not a grass or not grasslike.
[1920–25; < Greek phorbḗ food, fodder, derivative of phérbein to feed]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1983) found grasses dominate areas recently colonized by prairie dogs and forbs increase over time following colonization.
saccharum 4 Tree Actaea pachypoda 7 Perennial forb Aesculus glabra 5 Tree Ageratina altissima 2 Perennial forb AILANTHUS ALTISSIMA * 0 Tree ALLIARIA PETIOLATA * 0 Biennial forb Allium tricoccum v.
In discussions with the UN Special Rapporteur on FoRB, Heiner Bielefeldt, they also shared challenges and best practice on addressing rights violations related to state control and regulation of religion, as well as extreme interpretations of religion.
plantagineum and the following variables were measured: percent bare ground; percent cover of litter, live vegetation, dead vegetation, live grass, live forbs, live shrubs, and bison fecal pats; the height of the tallest grass and tallest forb; and the frequency of grass defoliation.
A comparison of the pre-fire and the 28-year post-fire vegetative cover and production at the Lacy site revealed significant differences in both vegetative cover and herbaceous productivity (P < 0.001); the differences were primarily due to a reduction in annual grasses (P < 0.001) and an increase in perennial forb cover and productivity (P < 0.001) (tables 1 and 2).
Vegetation type (grass, forb, bare ground, woody), height, and vertical intercept of woody vegetation (distance from ground to woody species in cm directly over meter-point) was recorded at each meter-point along transects.
Forb and grass species were often present in small quantities in the diet (less than 2%).
Aquatic plants accounted for 1.9%, forbs 1.1%, and grasses 0.9%.
The springtime diet of whitetail deer almost everywhere is composed of about 80 percent forbs. Forbs are mostly broad-leafed weeds.
Of seven vegetation variables, grass cover best predicted occurrence, followed by forb cover.