forced

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forced

 (fôrst)
adj.
1. Imposed by force; involuntary: was condemned to a life of forced labor; a plane that made a forced landing.
2. Produced under strain; not spontaneous: forced laughter.

forced

(fɔːst)
adj
1. done because of force; compulsory: forced labour.
2. false or unnatural: a forced smile.
3. due to an emergency or necessity: a forced landing.
4. (General Physics) physics caused by an external agency: a forced vibration; a forced draught.
forcedly adv
ˈforcedness n

forced

(fɔrst, foʊrst)

adj.
1. enforced or compulsory: forced labor.
2. strained, unnatural, or affected: a forced laugh.
3. subjected to force.
4. required by circumstances; emergency: a forced landing of an airplane.
[1540–50]
forc•ed•ly (ˈfɔr sɪd li, ˈfoʊr-) adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.forced - produced by or subjected to forcing; "forced-air heating"; "furnaces of the forced-convection type"; "forced convection in plasma generators"
2.forced - forced or compelled; "promised to abolish forced labor"
involuntary, nonvoluntary, unvoluntary - not subject to the control of the will; "involuntary manslaughter"; "involuntary servitude"; "an involuntary shudder"; "It (becoming a hero) was involuntary. They sank my boat"- John F.Kennedy
3.forced - made necessary by an unexpected situation or emergencyforced - made necessary by an unexpected situation or emergency; "a forced landing"
unscheduled - not scheduled or not on a regular schedule; "an unscheduled meeting"; "the plane made an unscheduled stop at Gander for refueling"
4.forced - lacking spontaneity; not natural; "a constrained smile"; "forced heartiness"; "a strained smile"
affected, unnatural - speaking or behaving in an artificial way to make an impression

forced

forced

adjective
1. Done under force:
2. Not natural or spontaneous:
Translations
قَسْري، متْعِب جِدا، حَثيث
usilovný
tvungen
áreynslumikill, erfiîur
vynútený

forced

[fɔːst]
A. ADJ
1. (= obligatory) [march] → forzado; [repatriation] → forzoso; [marriage] → forzado, por la fuerza
2. (= from necessity) [landing] → forzoso
3. (= contrived, strained) [smile] → forzado
to sound forcedparecer forzado
4. (Hort, Agr) [vegetable, fruit] → de crecimiento acelerado
forced lettuceslechugas fpl de crecimiento acelerado
B. CPD forced entry N (Jur) → allanamiento m de morada
there was no sign of forced entryno había señales de que hubieran forzado la entrada
forced labour Ntrabajos mpl forzados

forced

[ˈfɔːrst] adj
[labour] → forcé(e)
[landing] → forcé(e)
(= unnatural) → forcé(e)force-feed [ˌfɔːrsˈfiːd] vt
[+ prisoner] → nourrir de force
[+ duck, goose] → gaver

forced

adj
(= imposed)Zwangs-; repatriationgewaltsam; marriage, resignation, withdrawalerzwungen; forced saleZwangsverkauf m; (= auction)Zwangsversteigerung f
(= contrived) smile, laughter, conversation, wordinggezwungen; behaviourgekünstelt; to sound forcedsich gezwungen or unnatürlich anhören
plantgetrieben

forced

:
forced entry
n (= break-in)Einbruch m
forced labour, (US) forced labor
nZwangsarbeit f
forced landing
n (Aviat) → Notlandung f
forced loan
nZwangsanleihe f
forced march
n (Mil) → Gewaltmarsch m
forced saving
nZwangssparen nt

forced

[fɔːst] adj (labour, marriage) → forzato/a

force

(foːs) noun
1. strength or power that can be felt. the force of the wind.
2. a person or thing that has great power. the forces of Nature.
3. (sometimes with capital) a group of men prepared for action. the police force; the Royal Air Force.
verb
1. to make (someone or something) do something, go somewhere etc, often against his etc will. He forced me to give him money.
2. to achieve by strength or effort. He forced a smile despite his grief.
forced adjective
done with great effort. a forced march.
ˈforceful adjective
powerful. a forceful argument.
ˈforcefully adverb
ˈforces noun plural
the army, navy and air force considered together. The Forces played a large part in the parade.
in/into force
in or into operation; working or effective. The new law is now in force.
References in periodicals archive ?
To arrive at any "first" poetics, for this tradition, is to acknowledge forcedness and may go back for Wordsworth to Milton's "forc'd fingers rude" (line 4) in "Lycidas." This in turn reconnects the most awkward poetic honesty to history, because all counts done in history are done with some degree of awkward coercion.
Not surprisingly, a major shortcoming of "Endless Eve" is its rigidity and forcedness, its lack of real wit.
No tragedian in the world could have acted the part of a right godly man better than these did; insomuch as a man unacquainted with such art, could never suspect any ambitious plot in them to raise sedition against the state, as they then had designed; or doubt that the vehemence of their voice (for the same words with the usual pronunciation had been of little force) and forcedness of their gesture and looks, could arise from anything else but zeal to the service of God.