foregoer


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fore·go 1

 (fôr-gō′)
tr.v. fore·went (-wĕnt′), fore·gone (-gôn′, -gŏn′), fore·go·ing, fore·goes (-gōz′)
To precede, as in time or place. See Usage Note at forgo.

[Middle English foregon, from Old English foregān : fore-, fore- + gān, go; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

fore·go′er n.

fore·go 2

 (fôr-gō′)
v.
Variant of forgo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally speaking, the regulation of transnational disputes must first and foregoer seek to balance the plaintiff's interests (access to the court, effective protection of assembled rights) and the defendant's interests (right to be heard).
From the point of view of intelligence services, post-totalitarianism does not differ from its totalitarian foregoer. There is still a centralized intelligence organization with extensive powers.
The fallout of such a situation was the institutionalization of lies in the society with impunity for liars and the foregoers' feeling of loss in addition to economic losses on the government due to paying subsidy to affluent groups.