forepeak


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fore·peak

 (fôr′pēk′)
n.
The section of a ship's hold that is within the angle made by the bow, used for trimming or for storage of cargo.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

forepeak

(ˈfɔːˌpiːk)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical the interior part of a vessel that is furthest forward
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
But the god changed into a dreadful lion there on the ship, in the bows, and roared loudly: amidships also he showed his wonders and created a shaggy bear which stood up ravening, while on the forepeak was the lion glaring fiercely with scowling brows.
As I did not wish to screw on the fresh-water pump so late, I went forward whistling, and with a key in my hand to unlock the forepeak scuttle, intending to serve the water out of a spare tank we kept there.
Its bent and broken wings and shattered stays sprawled amidst new splintered wood, and its forepeak stuck into the ground.
An inquest held on July 30, 1919, the 2nd engineer Officer Henry Fraser admitted he took a naked light down into the forepeak despite notices on the ship warning against using naked lights on the vessel.
The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore said no injuries were reported on the Alnic, which suffered some damage to its forepeak tank well above the waterline.
There he'll be, head down, bum up in the sweaty, lurching depths of Duende's forepeak when the proverbial hits the fan.
There is also a sleek, planked war canoe from the Solomon Islands, with high, converging washboards at the bow rising to a neat forepeak. Adi Viti is a beautiful Fijian, single-outrigger, sailing canoe, and there is a vivid, red, white, yellow and blue, double-outrigger Balinese jukung, which exhibits design features that would not look out of place on a modern racing trimaran.
Robert Lackenby, a 31-year-old foreman welder, from Heaton, was on deck when he heard shouts of fire and saw smoke belching out of the forepeak.