foreseeability


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foreseeability

(fɔːˌsiːəˈbɪlətɪ)
n
the ability to foresee
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The appellate court said the Texas Supreme Court had previously rejected the notion that "mere foreseeability is the boundary between accidental and intentional conduct.
A medical malpractice claim arises from the foreseeability of potential harm to a patient from the doctor's actions, not the formation of a physician-patient relationship, the Supreme Court ruled in Warren v.
Case Study: Pipeline Break," "Foreseeability: Extreme Weather Events," "Environmental Disaster Preparedness Are You Ready?" and "Environmental Disaster Recovery Help Please?"
Cohen, a Boston attorney who represented the accounting firm, said the court correctly established the "middle ground" of the Restatement rule as the standard of care between accountants and third parties, rejecting the "very limited" near-privity rule as well as the "overly broad" reasonable foreseeability rule, which would have "opened the door to a lot of problems for accountants."
Recovering lost profits generally requires the plaintiff to successfully address the following legal rules: the proximate cause rule, the reasonable certainty rule, and the foreseeability rule.
Moreover, the Constitution requires that the adopted laws have foreseeability, stability and security, as is not the case here.
The appeals court panel stated that the harm caused by the defendant nurse was "not within the scope of foreseeability."
Hall rejected the hospital's contention that a "special relationship" duty was impossible because of the lack of foreseeability of the attack on Denisenko.
Under English law, a duty of care arises where there is proximity, foreseeability and where it is fair, just and reasonable to impose such a duty.The UK Court of Appeal however upheld a ruling by the High Court that the tea producer owed no duty of care in relation to the operations of its Kenyan subsidiary.
(1) the foreseeability of harm to the plaintiff, (2) the degree of certainty that the plaintiff suffered injury, (3) the closeness of the connection between the defendant's conduct and the injury suffered, the (4) moral blame attached to the defendant's conduct, the (5) policy of preventing future harm, the (6) extent of the burden to the defendant and consequences to the community of imposing a duty to exercise care with resulting liability for breach, and (7) the availability, cost, and prevalence of insurance for the risk involved.
Applying the Law: Foreseeability And Reasonable Precautions 16
Whether the PCP is liable may turn on the issue of foreseeability, and an immediate referral to a psychiatrist would have been a more prudent course of action.