foresight


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fore·sight

 (fôr′sīt′)
n.
1. The ability or action of imagining or anticipating what might happen in the future.
2. Care in providing for the future: Spending all of your money at once shows little foresight.

fore′sight′ed adj.
fore′sight′ed·ly adv.
fore′sight′ed·ness n.
fore′sight′ful adj.

foresight

(ˈfɔːˌsaɪt)
n
1. provision for or insight into future problems, needs, etc
2. the act or ability of foreseeing
3. the act of looking forward
4. (Surveying) surveying a reading taken looking forwards to a new station, esp in levelling from a point of known elevation to a point the elevation of which is to be determined. Compare backsight
5. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the front sight on a firearm
ˌforeˈsighted adj
ˌforeˈsightedly adv
ˌforeˈsightedness n

fore•sight

(ˈfɔrˌsaɪt, ˈfoʊr-)

n.
1. care or provision for the future; provident care; prudence.
2. the act or power of foreseeing; prevision; prescience.
3. an act of looking forward.
4. knowledge or insight of the future.
[1250–1300]
fore′sight`ed, adj.
fore′sight`ed•ly, adv.
fore′sight`ed•ness, n.
fore′sight`ful, adj.

Foresight

 of housekeepers: company of housekeepers, 15th century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foresight - providence by virtue of planning prudently for the future
providence - the prudence and care exercised by someone in the management of resources
2.foresight - seeing ahead; knowing in advance; foreseeing
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension

foresight

foresight

noun
1. Unusual or creative discernment or perception:
2. The exercise of good judgment or common sense in practical matters:
Translations
بَصيرَه، تَبَصُّر
prozíravost
forudseenhed
fyrirhyggja, framsÿni
predvidevanje
ileri görüş

foresight

[ˈfɔːsaɪt] Nprevisión f
to have or show foresightser previsor or precavido
he had the foresight totuvo la precaución de ...
lack of foresightimprevisión f, falta f de previsión

foresight

[ˈfɔːrsaɪt] nprévoyance f

foresight

nWeitblick m

foresight

[ˈfɔːˌsaɪt] nprevidenza

foresee

(foːˈsiː) past tense foreˈsaw (-ˈsoː) : past participle foreˈseen verb
to see or know about before or in advance. He could foresee the difficulties.
foreˈseeable adjective
able to be foreseen. in the foreseeable future (= soon; within a short space of time).
ˈforesight (-sӕit) noun
the ability to see in advance what may happen and to plan for it. She had the foresight to drive carefully in case the roads were icy.

foresight

n. precaución, previsión.
References in classic literature ?
Everything had been calculated with a depth of precognition which, for the first time in thirty years, recalled to him the solid foresight and inflexible logic of the great cardinal.
This providence is over my fate, that I have to be without foresight.
It can harmonize, assimilate, and protect the several parts and members, and extend the benefit of its foresight and precautions to each.
He had foresight, but has less now than formerly, pointing to a moral retrogression, which, when taken with the decline of his fortunes, seems to indicate some evil influence, probably drink, at work upon him.
In this welcome provision she recognized her mother's foresight, and, on examining the gifts, she found a purse, in which the baroness had put the money belonging to her daughter, adding to it the amount of her own savings.
Happily, the architect had foresight to build it strong: the narrow windows are deeply set in the wall, and the corners defended with large jutting stones.
It is in vain to hope to guard against events too mighty for human foresight or precaution, and it would be idle to object to a government because it could not perform impossibilities.
The foresight of the convention has accordingly taken care that the progress of population may be accompanied with a proper increase of the representative branch of the government.
By careful selection they rear only the hardiest specimens of each species, and with almost supernatural foresight they regulate the birth rate to merely offset the loss by death.
One doubted, the other believed; one had a prudent foresight, the other blind confidence.
But later on, to fit what had occurred, the historians provided cunningly devised evidence of the foresight and genius the generals who, of all the blind tools of history were the most enslaved and involuntary.
Already the Bell System has gone far in this direction by organizing what might fairly be called a foresight department.