forgeability


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forge 1

 (fôrj)
n.
1. A furnace or hearth where metals are heated or wrought; a smithy.
2. A workshop where pig iron is transformed into wrought iron.
v. forged, forg·ing, forg·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To form (metal, for example) by heating in a forge and beating or hammering into shape.
b. To form (metal) by a mechanical or hydraulic press.
2. To give form or shape to, especially by means of careful effort: forge a treaty; forge a close relationship.
3. To fashion or reproduce for fraudulent purposes; counterfeit: forge a signature.
v.intr.
1. To work at a forge or smithy.
2. To make a forgery or counterfeit.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *faurga, from Latin fabrica, from faber, worker.]

forge′a·bil′i·ty n.
forge′a·ble adj.
forg′er n.

forge 2

 (fôrj)
intr.v. forged, forg·ing, forg·es
1. To advance gradually but steadily: forged ahead through throngs of shoppers.
2. To advance with an abrupt increase of speed: forged into first place with seconds to go.

[Probably from forge.]

forgeability

(ˌfɔːdʒəˈbɪlətɪ)
adj
(Metallurgy) the suitability of a substance for forging
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon (C) is the major element which determines the strength and hardness level of carbon steels, and the carbon content described in Table 1 was aimed for the Steel1 to have surface hardness of more than 700 HV required for wheel bearings after IH without any degradation of forgeability, cutting and tooling.
Further, this composite has been reported to have excellent forgeability [12] that allows forging of parts with complex geometry free of cracks in one forging operation.
Mori, "Effect of cast structure and forging conditions on upset forgeability of a flame-resistant magnesium alloys," Journal of Japan Institute of Light Metals, vol.