forgivable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

for·give

 (fər-gĭv′, fôr-)
v. for·gave (-gāv′), for·giv·en (-gĭv′ən), for·giv·ing, for·gives
v.tr.
1. To give up resentment against or stop wanting to punish (someone) for an offense or fault; pardon.
2. To relent in being angry or in wishing to exact punishment for (an offense or fault).
3. To absolve from payment of (a debt, for example).
v.intr.
To grant forgiveness.

[Middle English forgiven, from Old English forgiefan; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

for·giv′a·ble adj.
for·giv′a·bly adv.
for·giv′er n.
Synonyms: forgive, pardon, excuse, condone
These verbs mean to refrain from imposing punishment on an offender or demanding satisfaction for an offense. The first three can be used as conventional ways of offering apology. More strictly, to forgive is to grant pardon without harboring resentment: "Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them" (Oscar Wilde).
Pardon more strongly implies release from the liability for or penalty entailed by an offense: After the revolution all political prisoners were pardoned.
To excuse is to pass over a mistake or fault without demanding punishment or redress: "Valencia was incredibly generous to these deadbeats. She memorized their poetry and excused their bad behavior" (David Sedaris).
To condone is to overlook an offense, usually a serious one, and often suggests tacit forgiveness: Failure to protest the policy may imply a willingness to condone it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.forgivable - easily excused or forgiven; "a venial error"
pardonable - admitting of being pardoned

forgivable

adjective pardonable, allowable, excusable, condonable, minor, slight, petty, understandable, unimportant, permissible, not serious, venial His sense of humour makes all else forgivable.

forgivable

adjective
Admitting of forgiveness or pardon:
Translations

forgivable

[fəˈgɪvəbl] ADJperdonable

forgivable

[fərˈgɪvəbəl] adjpardonnable

forgivable

adjverzeihlich, verzeihbar

forgivable

[fəˈgɪvəbl] adjperdonabile
References in classic literature ?
As he watched the cat deliberately crouch for the spring, Cocky, gallant mote of life that he was, betrayed his one and forgivable panic.
A very natural and forgivable mistake, Meg, but one that had better be remedied before you take to different ways, for children should draw you nearer than ever, not separate you, as if they were all yours, and John had nothing to do but support them.
Louisiana offered the company a $1.5 million grant to offset the cost of upgrading the Marrero facility and a performance-based, forgivable loan of $561,000.
In 2018, DPP provided more than $19 million in forgivable grants through the FHLBank Chicago's participating member institutions to assist with down payment and closing costs for eligible households.
Who could forget the Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal?-?this was not because of a bug, which could be forgivable, but this was by design.
Charles River Associates announced an adjustment to its previously released 2018 first quarter financial results to reflect a change to non-cash forgivable loan amortization.
Of the 3,902 FINRA member firms (as tracked by Fishbowl Strategies in late February), approximately 25% offer some form of forgivable note (or sign-on bonus) to aid in the expenses and disruption of a broker dealer switch.
The first quarter 2017 results included USD 0.8m of non-cash income tax benefit, USD 8.9m of non-cash charges for depreciation, amortization and compensation, USD 1.6m of amortization of retention and forgivable loans and USD 0.5m of interest expense.
It is understandably forgivable to see those who never lived through martial law favoring the burial of Ferdinand E.
According to the Des Moines Register, the incentives include a $500,000 forgivable loan, $500,000 in a zero-interest loan plus $630,000 in tax credits.
That is surely forgivable in any marriage - but a deliberate and sustained affair is not.