forktail


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forktail

(ˈfɔːkˌteɪl)
n
(Animals) a name used for various fish and bird species having a forked tail
References in periodicals archive ?
Balasubramanian, "Breeding behaviour and nest tree use by Indian Grey Hornbill Ocyceros birostris in the Eastern Ghats, India," Forktail, no.
Lei, "Results of a survey for waterbirds in the lower Yangtze floodplain, China, in January-February 2004," Forktail, vol.
Forktail catfish, Arius graeffei, was the dominant bycatch (47% of the total and 5.0-10.0 cm TL), followed by glassfish, Ambassis jacksoniensis and A.
One Ishnura verticalis, eastern forktail, was observed in a small pond at the Children's Garden at Garfield Park Conservatory.
A study published in Forktail (the Journal of Asian Ornithology) has identified 13 bird species and 14 subspecies that are at risk of global extinction due primarily to the bird trade.
After over-wintering beneath the ice--where some nymphs actively fed and grew, while others, and some eggs, were in diapause (dormancy) --the first species to typically emerge from the aquatic realm is the hardy but dainty damselfly, known as the eastern forktail. Common here, it keeps a low profile, inhabiting dense vegetation near water, gleaning small insects and avoiding predators.
Described by an international team of researchers in the August Forktail, Orthotomus chaktomuk takes its name from a Khmer word meaning "four faces," a reference to the rivers that converge to form an "X" shape at Phnom Penh.
The discovery of the bird, also known as Orthotomus chaktomuk, was announced in a special online edition of the Oriental Bird Club's journal Forktail, the statement said.
Costs of sexual interactions to females in Rambur's forktail damselfly, Ischnura ramburi (Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae).
Each patrician is associated with a forest animal or plant, like deer, forktail, or civet, whose consumption clan members avoid.
They describe the find in the Oriental Bird Club journal, Forktail.
A description of the new species is published in the July issue of the Oriental Bird Club's journal Forktail.