form genus


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form genus

n.
A category of biological classification based on morphology rather than phylogeny. Used especially of fossil plants and deuteromycetes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

form genus

n
(Biology) a group of species (form species) that have similar structural characteristics but are not closely related
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

form′ ge`nus


n.
a genus made up of species, esp. of fossil forms, that bear some morphological resemblance to each other but that may not be closely related in evolutionary origin.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.form genus - (biology) an artificial taxonomic category for organisms of which the true relationships are obscureform genus - (biology) an artificial taxonomic category for organisms of which the true relationships are obscure
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
genus - (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more species
2.form genus - an artificial taxonomic category established on the basis of morphological resemblance for organisms of obscure true relationships especially fossil forms
genus - (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more species
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The strategy of looking to the biological works for ways to resolve metaphysical puzzles concerning substance is implicitly challenged by Alan Code's "An Aristotelian Puzzle about Definition: Metaphysics Z.12." Within that chapter Aristotle argues that if a definition is a principle of both the unity and the substantiality of a living substance, such a principle is to be found in the differentia expressed in a definition, taking the form genus + differentia.
The fossil record is based exclusively on pollen of the form genus Verrutricolporites van der Hammen and Wijmstra (1964).
The form genus "Nymphaeites" is traditionally used to describe Neogene western North American megafossil leaves, petioles, rhizomes, and roots of water lily and water lily-like plants.
Physonemus remains a form genus, of a large chondrichthyan fish of late Paleozoic marine waters, known only from its fin spines.