formalistic


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for·mal·ism

 (fôr′mə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Rigorous or excessive adherence to recognized forms, as in religion or art.
2. An instance of rigorous or excessive adherence to recognized forms.
3. A method of aesthetic analysis that emphasizes structural elements and artistic techniques rather than content, especially in literary works.

for′mal·ist adj. & n.
for′mal·is′tic adj.
for′mal·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.formalistic - concerned with or characterized by rigorous adherence to recognized forms (especially in religion or art); "highly formalized plays like `Waiting for Godot'"
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

formalistic

adjective
Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

formalistic

[fɔːməlɪstɪk] ADJformalista
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

formalistic

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

formalistic

[ˌfɔːməˈlɪstɪk] adjformalistico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
It boggles the mind why we still have a member of the Executive declaring the budget to Parliament in such a formalistic ceremony.
based on purely formalistic reasoning relating to territory, rather than
Chapter 5 shifts the focus from formalistic analysis to thematic exploration.
All of the creatives to be featured have as a common denominator the exploration of aesthetic and formalistic possibilities of audio-visual art and plot twists of academic film writing.
The Court did note, in another case, that the minimum residency requirement is not an empty formalistic one.
Rivas-Estrada, that "requirement isn't formalistic. It's practical....The point is to give fair notice."
Markiza] the right to duly act in court, ignored without evident reasons the evidence included in the file, and only cited the claims of Pavol Rusko about his signing of the promissory note in 2000," lawyer of TV Markiza, Tomas Kamenec, reproached the judge for her formalistic methods.
It's a very formalistic method,' he added, noting the increasingly hostile approach of the United States in the Middle East.
"My newer ones [from the series "Inceptus"] have a more formalistic approach with only squares and colors and also come from a computer inspiration, with pixels, and it's like a blown-up [pixelated] detail."
Benilde, Cruz is well versed with regard to formalistic approaches.
Case studies illustrate how antitrust law is evolving away from a formalistic analytical model that depends on separating conduct into discrete categories towards reliance on a set of core concepts that have been greatly influenced by economic theory.