forsake

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for·sake

 (fôr-sāk′, fər-)
tr.v. for·sook (-so͝ok′), for·sak·en (-sā′kən), for·sak·ing, for·sakes
1. To give up (something formerly held dear); renounce: forsook liquor.
2. To leave altogether; abandon: forsook Hollywood and returned to the legitimate stage.

[Middle English forsaken, from Old English forsacan; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

forsake

(fəˈseɪk)
vb (tr) , -sakes, -saking, -sook (-ˈsʊk) or -saken (-ˈseɪkən)
1. to abandon
2. to give up (something valued or enjoyed)
[Old English forsacan]
forˈsaker n

for•sake

(fɔrˈseɪk)

v.t. -sook, -sak•en, -sak•ing.
1. to quit or leave entirely; abandon; desert: to forsake one's family.
2. to give up or renounce (a habit, way of life, etc.); forgo.
[before 900; Middle English: to deny, reject, Old English forsacan (c. Old Saxon forsakan, Old High German firsahhan)]
for•sak′er, n.

forsake


Past participle: forsaken
Gerund: forsaking

Imperative
forsake
forsake
Present
I forsake
you forsake
he/she/it forsakes
we forsake
you forsake
they forsake
Preterite
I forsook
you forsook
he/she/it forsook
we forsook
you forsook
they forsook
Present Continuous
I am forsaking
you are forsaking
he/she/it is forsaking
we are forsaking
you are forsaking
they are forsaking
Present Perfect
I have forsaken
you have forsaken
he/she/it has forsaken
we have forsaken
you have forsaken
they have forsaken
Past Continuous
I was forsaking
you were forsaking
he/she/it was forsaking
we were forsaking
you were forsaking
they were forsaking
Past Perfect
I had forsaken
you had forsaken
he/she/it had forsaken
we had forsaken
you had forsaken
they had forsaken
Future
I will forsake
you will forsake
he/she/it will forsake
we will forsake
you will forsake
they will forsake
Future Perfect
I will have forsaken
you will have forsaken
he/she/it will have forsaken
we will have forsaken
you will have forsaken
they will have forsaken
Future Continuous
I will be forsaking
you will be forsaking
he/she/it will be forsaking
we will be forsaking
you will be forsaking
they will be forsaking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been forsaking
you have been forsaking
he/she/it has been forsaking
we have been forsaking
you have been forsaking
they have been forsaking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been forsaking
you will have been forsaking
he/she/it will have been forsaking
we will have been forsaking
you will have been forsaking
they will have been forsaking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been forsaking
you had been forsaking
he/she/it had been forsaking
we had been forsaking
you had been forsaking
they had been forsaking
Conditional
I would forsake
you would forsake
he/she/it would forsake
we would forsake
you would forsake
they would forsake
Past Conditional
I would have forsaken
you would have forsaken
he/she/it would have forsaken
we would have forsaken
you would have forsaken
they would have forsaken
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.forsake - leave someone who needs or counts on youforsake - leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch; "The mother deserted her children"
leave - go and leave behind, either intentionally or by neglect or forgetfulness; "She left a mess when she moved out"; "His good luck finally left him"; "her husband left her after 20 years of marriage"; "she wept thinking she had been left behind"
expose - abandon by leaving out in the open air; "The infant was exposed by the teenage mother"; "After Christmas, many pets get abandoned"
walk out - leave suddenly, often as an expression of disapproval; "She walked out on her husband and children"
ditch - forsake; "ditch a lover"
maroon, strand - leave stranded or isolated with little hope of rescue; "the travellers were marooned"

forsake

verb
1. desert, leave, abandon, quit, strand, jettison, repudiate, cast off, disown, jilt, throw over, leave in the lurch I still love him and would never forsake him.
2. give up, set aside, relinquish, forgo, kick (informal), yield, surrender, renounce, have done with, stop using, abdicate, stop having, turn your back on, forswear She forsook her notebook for new technology.
3. abandon, leave, go away from, take your leave of He has no plans to forsake the hills.

forsake

verb
To give up or leave without intending to return or claim again:
Translations
يَهْجُر، يَتَخَلّى عن
opustit
forladesvigte
hylätä
yfirgefa, hverfa frá
apleisti
atstātpamest
terketmek

forsake

[fəˈseɪk] (forsook (pt) (forsaken (pp))) VT (= abandon) → abandonar; (= give up) [+ plan] → renunciar a; [+ belief] → renegar de

forsake

[fərˈseɪk] [forsook] [fərˈsʊk] (pt) [forsaken] [fərˈseɪkən] (pp) vtabandonner

forsake

pret <forsook> ptp <forsaken>
vtverlassen; bad habitsaufgeben, entsagen (+dat) (geh); his charm never forsakes himsein Charme lässt ihn nie im Stich

forsake

[fəˈseɪk] (forsook (pt) (forsaken (pp))) vt (person) → abbandonare; (place) → lasciare

forsake

(fəˈseik) past tense forsook (fəˈsuk) : past participle forˈsaken verb
to leave alone; to abandon. He was forsaken by his friends.
References in classic literature ?
With that thought, and before she had time to remember any reasons why it could not be true, came a new sense of forsakenness and disappointment.
Parallel motifs also appear in the work of Nietzsche (nihilism), Heidegger (Seinsverlassenheit) and Sartre (delaissement), each harnessing this existential state of forsakenness and dread to present philosophies of being in a world that is neither fully ordered nor intelligible.
Our brief to the filmmaker was to reflect the doubt and forsakenness that life throws at you and to track the journey from grim reality and to bleed into the colour of joy.
As Christians, we join our forsakenness to Jesus Crucified on the Cross.
Scioli and Biller (2009) discussed some of the types of hopelessness are alienation (feeling of being different from others), forsakenness (feeling of being alone when someone is needed badly in the great time), uninspired (lack of attachment or undervalued), powerlessness (difficulty in achieving goals), subjugation (suppression), limitedness (feelings of failing to do mastery), doom (feeling of despair that one's life is over), captivity (other's or self-imprisonment related to emotions), and helplessness (feelings of being vulnerable).
If we assume there was no longer any dear, kind woman seeing to it that the prisoner possessed at least a pair of socks and received proper meals, surely a person confronted with this exemplar of utter forsakenness must inevitably be overwhelmed with a compassion leaping and warbling from all the immediacies that surround us.
In journeying through the forsakenness of Good Friday into the hope of Easter, there is an expectation; there is the call of Jesus for us to join in the kingdom journey.
Levinas writes, "That comedy is enacted equivocally between temple and theater, but in it the laughter sticks to one's throat when the neighbor approaches--that is, when his face, or his forsakenness, draws near" (141).
267) and that by being an act of God's love it is essential to recognize "both that the God forsakenness of Jesus is quite concretely real and also that both Jesus and the Father remain faithful to each other" (p.
She looked at me and her eyes were yellow with forsakenness.
Yet, those feelings of closeness are easily swallowed up by a sense of separation and forsakenness as one considers the current situation.
The Reformed tradition, on the other hand, has understood Christ's descent into hell as his suffering the torments of the damned, including forsakenness by God, before his death.