fortune-hunter

fortune-hunter

n
a person who seeks to secure a fortune, esp through marriage
ˈfortune-ˌhunting adj, n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

fortune-hunter

[ˈfɔːtʃənˌhʌntəʳ] ncacciatore m di dote
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'A mere fortune-hunter!' cried the son, indignantly.
She pictured him as a crafty adventurer, a wretched fortune-hunter. For some reason or other she imagined him a sinister person with a black moustache, a face thin and hawk-like, and unpleasant eyes.
'If you were so dull a fortune-hunter that you deceived yourself, or if you were so greedy and grasping that you were over-willing to be deceived by appearances, is it my fault, you adventurer?' the lady demands, with great asperity.
Lest the reader, however, should be misled, I wish to add, that these two worthies are not to be taken as specimens of New York morality at all--no place on earth being more free from fortune-hunters, or of a higher tone of social morals in this delicate particular.
Follow the wisecracking fortune-hunter and his aristocratic companion on their quest for long-lost treasure.
The tale involves a runaway heiress (Claudette Colbert) whose wealthy father (Walter Connolly) is attempting to get her marriage annulled from a fortune-hunter. With little common sense (or cents), since the spoiled rich girl has left in a hurry, she takes a long night bus trip to reunite with her husband.
Her biography gives a detailed account of the abuse and cruelty Mary Eleanor was dealt by her second husband, the Irish fortune-hunter Andrew Robinson Stoney.
In fact he is a fortune-hunter, marrying vulnerable young women and stealing their nest-eggs.
They'll make a lovely couple - he's Basshunter and she's fortune-hunter.
Luckily, assistance is at hand in the form of craggy daredevil fortune-hunter, who's hoping for a share of the profits.
Florence was the setting for his master work, The Portrait of a Lady, with its central character, Gilbert Osmond, a cold, sadistic fortune-hunter with a taste in rare antiques, probably modelled upon characters he met in the Florence salons of the wealthy expatriates.
Cynthia Nixon is right on the mark as the vampish fortune-hunter in black lingerie.