fossilization


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fos·sil·ize

 (fŏs′ə-līz′)
v. fos·sil·ized, fos·sil·iz·ing, fos·sil·iz·es
v.tr.
1. To convert into a fossil.
2. To make outmoded or inflexible with time; antiquate.
v.intr.
To become a fossil.

fos′sil·i·za′tion (-sə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fossilization - the process of fossilizing a plant or animal that existed in some earlier age; the process of being turned to stone
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
petrifaction, petrification - the process of turning some plant material into stone by infiltration with water carrying mineral particles without changing the original shape
2.fossilization - becoming inflexible or out of date
passage, transition - the act of passing from one state or place to the next
Translations

fossilization

[ˌfɒsɪlaɪˈzeɪʃən] Nfosilización f

fossilization

nVersteinerung f, → Fossilierung f (spec); (fig: of person) → Verknöcherung f

fossilization

[ˌfɒsɪlaɪˈzeɪʃn] nfossilizzazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
By comparing the fossilized eyes with optic tissues from living crane-flies, the researchers were able to look closer at how the fossilization process has affected the conservation of compound eyes across geological time.
"Altogether this information will help to identify which types of microorganism are most likely to have been preserved on Mars, and which geochemical conditions most favour fossilization."
Like the professor , Ajani slso emphasized that decay of soft materials like human bodies, clothes, polythene etc rarely occur in salty terrains or coal region because of what is referred to as fossilization and biological non-decomposition either chemically or physically.
"We demonstrate that the elemental and molecular characteristics of these 3.4 Ga microfossils are consistent with biological remains, slightly degraded by fossilization processes," Jullien Alleon from MIT, the lead author of the study, said in a (https://www.scimex.org/newsfeed/3.4-billion-year-old-wa-fossils-are-similar-to-modern-bacteria) statement .
The hard parts (skeletons) which usually undergo fossilization keep valuable information of biogenic processes, and the taphonomic characteristics supply data on the postmortem changes [1].
His current interests focus on computer modeling and simulation of evolutionary and fossilization processes, toward an understanding of the pace and causes of human evolution in an ecological context.
"Most mushrooms grow and are gone within a few days." Mushrooms' soft, fragile structures decay rapidly, making the chances of fossilization extremely low, he said.
Whatever they were attached to during their young lives did not survive fossilization.
The basics of fossilization are discussed along with its major effects on the fossil record of cetaceans.