fosterage


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fos·ter·age

 (fô′stə-rĭj, fŏs′-)
n.
1. The act of fostering; nurturance or promotion: government fosterage of new technologies.
2. The act or custom of placing a child with a foster parent or parents, especially when practiced as a traditional childrearing method in certain societies.

fosterage

(ˈfɒstərɪdʒ)
n
1. (Law) the act of caring for or bringing up a foster child
2. (Law) the condition or state of being a foster child
3. the act of encouraging or promoting
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fosterage - encouragement; aiding the development of something
encouragement - the expression of approval and support
2.fosterage - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
acculturation, enculturation, socialisation, socialization - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
References in classic literature ?
A youth passed in solitude, my best years spent under your gentle and feminine fosterage, has so refined the groundwork of my character that I cannot overcome an intense distaste to the usual brutality exercised on board ship: I have never believed it to be necessary, and when I heard of a mariner equally noted for his kindliness of heart and the respect and obedience paid to him by his crew, I felt myself peculiarly fortunate in being able to secure his services.
Skidmore details the turbulent events of Richard's childhood during the Wars of the Roses, including his exile in Flanders and his time under the fosterage of Richard Neville, building a picture of a youth shaped by rapid changes of fortune amid ruthless politics.
This form of teaching and learning politics through experience in a demanding and dangerous community was similar to older patterns that commended promising children to fosterage and to apprenticeships as pages and junior wives.
But fosterage was something noble families did and around the age of eight he would have gone to another household to learn how to be a young nobleman.
Perceptions or constructions of similarity based on birth, fosterage, residence, and sustained use of particular areas of land may all influence oobi identification by self and others.
'The emotional world of kinship: Children's experiences of fosterage in East Cameron', Childhood, 15, 3:355-377.
The article discusses, inter alia, situations of neglect in the family after return for "family reunification" and problematic "fosterage" arrangements in Spain.
The German kitchen manufacturer's continuous development is based on the research for innovations, the use of the most advanced manufacturing technologies and the fosterage of the traditional craft.
If he had not agreed to marry Polly Mooney, she would very likely have been sent off to one of the "Maggies" institutions to spend her life as an unpaid slave after having had her child taken away to die from neglect or be sold into fosterage.
Specialty planning [C.sub.1]: Rationality of planning [C.sub.11], skill fosterage [C.sub.12], combination of theories and practice [C.sub.13], teaching and practice course management [C.sub.14], industry-university-research cooperation [C.sub.15].
Adult children (aged 35-65) were asked to evaluate the following nine statements concerning filial piety to old parents: (1) Always being grateful to parents for their fosterage; (2) Respect for parents, no matter how parents treated you; (3) Give up your own aspirations to realize parent's expectations if the two are not the same; (4) Son should live with parents after he is married; (5) Support parents to enable them to have a better life; (6) Say some good words to save the face of parents; (7) Do something to enable your family to be honorable; (8) Daughter should frequently visit her own parents if she married out of her family; (9) Daughters have the same responsibility to support old parents as sons do.