found art


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Related to found art: Found objects

found art

n.
Art consisting of found objects, found poems, or other found materials, often modified or manipulated by the artist.
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He said he has found art and immersion in indigenous communities as a way of connecting to the roots of Mindanao and wants to share this to the world.
Photographer and typographist Paschali has always found art to be an enormous part of her life.
Following a muse of metal and his love of the hunt, Cole bends steel to his will, to create found art for hunters and collectors alike.
Following a PTSD diagnosis, the artist found art journaling soothing.
Now, these bits of found art are the centerpiece of Bidas' controversial exhibition, her final project before graduating from Beit Berl College, one of Israel's foremost art schools.
LD+A contributor Don Peifer had this to say about the article: "Found art repurposed into luminaires can make for a compelling point-of-interest in certain settings, but it is not synonymous with quality of light.
Despite such a background, he found art that took him to a whole different place, not least sculpted neolithic stones that made him feel like a novice.
090715COWAN4.JPG 090715COWAN4.JPG Lost and Found Art Show for Holmfirth Art Week In focus ...
The exhibit features award-winning artists Marina Bosetti (decorative tile art) and Autumn Cobeland (Greenway artist), nature photographers Pam McClure and Margaret Harrell, abstract artist Michael Morrison, found art clockwork creations by David Greway, and unique hand-crafted jewelry by Missie McReynolds.
Beth said Dylan told the gallery he found art relaxing.
There are relatively few monographs focusing on digital artists who work in this medium: Maggie Taylor's work helps define a genre as well as breaking new ground, and makes for a top recommendation for any modern arts collection looking for representations of found art and digital display.
Lee has moved away from the creepiness of "Where is the Black Beast?" and has deftly opened a new approach to the idea of the spectacle, fabricating a reinvigorating dance of classic conceptual components: projection, found art, and appropriation.