found object


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found object

n.
A natural object or an artifact not originally intended as art, found and considered to have aesthetic value. Also called objet trouvé.

[Translation of French objet trouvé : objet, object + trouvé, past participle of trouver, to find.]

found object

n
another name for objet trouvé

found′ ob′ject


n.
a natural or manufactured object that is perceived as being aesthetically satisfying and is exhibited as such.
[1955–60; translation of French objet trouvé]
References in periodicals archive ?
I acknowledge that sculpting with paper can be a challenge, so take a found object or create an object out of clay, cardboard or other material and then cover it with pages from the book.
In Preschool 4, students enjoyed a found object snowmen project.
The found object is completely inconsistent with the query (Fig.
FROM DUCHAMP TO GARBAGE: THE LEGACY OF THE FOUND OBJECT
Running through May 13, the exhibition includes figurative painting, pastel drawing, urban cityscapes, found object mosaics and sculpture.
The text emphasizes the importance of the 'found object' in the creation of modern art and how these everyday items can be utilized to create expression and explore life and ideas.
Also, the newly found object, along with Pluto, may be one of many objects residing in the Kuiper belt.
A modest piece of home was thus promoted into the vaunted world of art through its selection as a found object.
Wendy Parry, museum and galleries manager, said: "They can be as creative as they like and bring in a found object that symbolises their life in some way, or a photograph representing their ideas.
Often, he presents a single item of this sort as a found object. His materials are not only affectless, they're aestheticless--more precisely, aesthetically anonymous.
Calculations by Syuichi Nakano, working at the Harvard Smithsonian Center, have revealed not only that the newly found object and HAPAG are one and the same, but also that HAPAG appears on several photographic plates taken in the 1950s and 1980s, though it was not identified at the time.