foundress


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foun·dress

 (foun′drĕs)
n. pl. foun·dress·es
1. A female founder.
2. A fertile female insect who founds a colony.

foundress

(ˈfaʊndrəs)
n
a female founder
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foundress - a woman founderfoundress - a woman founder      
beginner, founder, founding father, father - a person who founds or establishes some institution; "George Washington is the father of his country"
References in classic literature ?
Here and there is born a Saint Theresa, foundress of nothing, whose loving heart-beats and sobs after an unattained goodness tremble off and are dispersed among hindrances, instead of centring in some long-recognizable deed.
Then she might have come down to us in history, hand in hand with Ann Hutchinson, as the foundress of a religious sect.
"She becomes the first foundress of an African-American women's Catholic order in the United States," Manseau said.
For the first 2 trials the Chi-squared test in the FREQ procedure was used to evaluate differences in success rates between media and foundress collection method, respectively.
July 27 in Foundress Hall on the AMC campus, rain or shine.
Anna Dengel, the foundress of the Medical Missionary Sisters, fought for this and won.
The smiles and gentleness reflected in the photos show something of the foundress' "serene and glowing" spirituality, for whom "God was a God of love and tenderness."
By any definition Mary was the mother foundress of the parish.
Marie Louise Angelica Clarac, April 6, 1817-June 21, 1887 : foundress of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Mary.
Indeed God did know what Mollie Rogers's future would hold for her; she would become the foundress of the first Catholic religious congregation of women established in the United States for the work of foreign missions.
Though the Poor Clares, in the words of their foundress, abandoned "the things of time for those of eternity," their art made their spirit quietly and profoundly felt.(40)
Second, in suggesting that Clare grew to become an alter Franciscus (132), Bartoli betrays a prejudice operative throughout the book that undermines Clare's position as foundress and creator of a new form of life for women, as she is constantly being compared to Francis as the standard for the charism.