fountainhead

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foun·tain·head

 (foun′tən-hĕd′)
n.
1. A spring that is the source or head of a stream.
2. A chief and copious source; an originator: "the intellectual fountainhead of the black conservatives" (Jerrold K. Footlick).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fountainhead

(ˈfaʊntɪnˌhɛd)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a spring that is the source of a stream
2. a principal or original source
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

foun•tain•head

(ˈfaʊn tnˌhɛd)

n.
1. a spring from which a stream flows.
2. a chief source: a fountainhead of information.
[1575–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fountainhead - an abundant source; "she was a well of information"
source - a document (or organization) from which information is obtained; "the reporter had two sources for the story"
2.fountainhead - the source of water from which a stream arises; "they tracked him back toward the head of the stream"
origin, source, root, rootage, beginning - the place where something begins, where it springs into being; "the Italian beginning of the Renaissance"; "Jupiter was the origin of the radiation"; "Pittsburgh is the source of the Ohio River"; "communism's Russian root"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fountainhead

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

fountainhead

[ˈfaʊntɪnhed] Nfuente f, origen m
to go to the fountainheadacudir a la propia fuente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
We can imagine with what feelings of awe and admiration he must have contemplated the Wind River Sierra, or bed of mountains; that great fountainhead from whose springs, and lakes, and melted snows some of those mighty rivers take their rise, which wander over hundreds of miles of varied country and clime, and find their way to the opposite waves of the Atlantic and the Pacific.
Tell me the real truth, as you have it from the fountainhead. And now, do not trouble yourself to be ashamed of either my feelings or your own.
If men will not drink of this at the fountainhead of the day, why, then, we must even bottle up some and sell it in the shops, for the benefit of those who have lost their subscription ticket to morning time in this world.