four-hundredth


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Adj.1.four-hundredth - the ordinal number of four hundred in counting order
ordinal - being or denoting a numerical order in a series; "ordinal numbers"; "held an ordinal rank of seventh"
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From all the cells, both those just commenced and those completed, being thus crowned by a strong coping of wax, the bees can cluster and crawl over the comb without injuring the delicate hexagonal walls, which are only about one four-hundredth of an inch in thickness; the plates of the pyramidal basis being about twice as thick.
7bn represents around one four-hundredth of total public spending, so clearly we can afford it.
Conferences and their consequent published papers are frequently troubled by a lack of cohesion; however, the four-hundredth anniversary of James I's accession offered a sharp focus for the 2003 conference in Hull from which these essays come.
Karen Ordahl Kupperman does not celebrate Jamestown in quite the same adulatory way that politicians and patriots will on its four-hundredth birthday, but she does believe that Jamestown is more important than many professional historians seem willing to concede.
In 1926, the four-hundredth anniversary of the death of Lancelot Andrewes, T.
What lack of respect to Cervantes, when we commemorate the four-hundredth anniversary of his Don Quixote de La Mancha without a mention of it in your magazine.
They note that de Kooning stayed in Brussels for some six months in 1924 but not that the year was widely considered as the four-hundredth anniversary of the birth of Pieter Brueghel the Elder, with various commemorative festivals duly held in that very city.
These coiling tool dimension corrections occur every four-hundredth of a second, much faster than can ever be achieved with a mechanically controlled system," Frost says.
Bellamy was helping to develop a program to celebrate the four-hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America.
This coincided with one of the first planned tourist events, the 1893 exhibition that was held in Chicago to commemorate the four-hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America: this attracted thousands of visitors.
The book followed closely on the heels of debates that were stimulated by the four-hundredth anniversary of Philip II's death in 1598 and concerned his attitudes to music and his role as patron.
The pledge first appeared in the magazine The Youth's Companion on September 8, 1892, as part of a national commemoration of the four-hundredth anniversary of Christopher Columbus's voyage to the New World.