four-stroke

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four-stroke

adj
(Automotive Engineering) relating to or designating an internal-combustion engine in which the piston makes four strokes for every explosion. US and Canadian name: four-cycle Compare two-stroke
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

four-stroke

[ˈfɔːstrəʊk] ADJ (Aut) → de cuatro tiempos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Yamaha Next generation 4.2-liter big-bore four-strokes are available in 225,250 and 300 horsepower.
Some 70-90 hp four-strokes are substantially heavier than your old engine and may bring the scuppers below the water, making self-bailing impossible.
It is being replaced by supposedly "cleaner" four-strokes.
Reigning champion and world No 2 Josh Coppins heads the field in the blue riband MX1 class for 250cc two-strokes and 450cc four-strokes.
It may be alone in its class of four-strokes, but can give those two-strokes a run for their money
"With the new four-strokes we've already been able to work out how to go one second faster at every race.
"The big four-strokes just come out of the corner and get to the next one before we can."
Two-stroke engines dominate recreational boating because they hold significant advantages over four-strokes. They are about one-third the weight, they are cheaper to make, they are simple to maintain, they rev up quickly, and they can run when tilted, even upside down.
It's so different to Motegi and Sepang and should give us a real chance to at least fight with the four-strokes.
Criville will race in the new-look class, now called MotoGP after the inclusion of 990cc four-strokes, in the latest stage of a career that has also seen him crowned 125cc world champion.
Yamaha have already committed Italy's Max Biaggi and Spain's Carlos Checa to their M1 and other manufacturers are busy developing new machines to join the switch to four-strokes.
Like many other modern four-strokes it has a lift pump that cycles on and off feeding fuel into the system, which then feeds a second high-pressure fuel pump.