four-wheeler


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four-wheel·er

(fôr′wē′lər, -hwē′-)
n.
A vehicle, especially an all-terrain vehicle, having four wheels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.four-wheeler - a hackney carriage with four wheelsfour-wheeler - a hackney carriage with four wheels
hackney, hackney carriage, hackney coach - a carriage for hire
References in classic literature ?
Ah, here is a four-wheeler, and Miss Morstan is inside.
He gave a shrill whistle, on which a street Arab led across a four-wheeler and opened the door.
A four-wheeler had driven up to the gate, and it was at this that the old ladies, peeping out bird-like from behind their curtains, directed an eager and questioning gaze.
Hosmer came for us in a hansom, but as there were two of us he put us both into it and stepped himself into a four-wheeler, which happened to be the only other cab in the street.
As far as the church door he brought her, and then, as he could go no farther, he conveniently vanished away by the old trick of stepping in at one door of a four-wheeler and out at the other.
It was nothing, however, to the disappointment awaiting me at the Albany, when I arrived in my four-wheeler at the appointed hour next morning.
Sit as far back as I might in the four-wheeler, I could conceal neither myself nor my connection with the huge iron-clamped case upon the roof: in my heated imagination its wood was glass through which all the world could see the guilty contents.
A four-wheeler stood before the gate under the weeping sky.
She had a trunk for her clothes and another for the various odds and ends, cushions, lampshades, photograph frames, with which she had tried to give the apartments a home-like air; she had two or three large cardboard boxes besides, but in all there was no more than could be put on the roof of a four-wheeler. As they drove through Victoria Street Philip sat well back in the cab in case Norah should happen to be passing.
Presently she came to a halt, and hailed a four-wheeler which was passing.
In the privacy of a four-wheeler, on her way to a charity cottage (one of a row) which by the exiguity of its dimensions and the simplicity of its accommodation, might well have been devised in kindness as a place of training for the still more straitened circumstances of the grave, she was forced to hid from her own child a blush of remorse and shame.
My client is outside in a four-wheeler. Can you come at once?"