fourchette

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four·chette

 (fo͝or-shĕt′)
n.
1. A narrow, forked strip of material joining the front and back sections of the fingers of gloves.
2. Anatomy A small band or fold of mucous membrane forming the posterior margin of the vulva and connecting the posterior ends of the labia majora.
3. Zoology See furcula.

[French, from Old French forchete, fork, diminutive of forche, pitchfork, from Latin furca.]

fourchette

(fʊəˈʃɛt)
n
1. (Anatomy) anatomy the bandlike fold of skin, about one inch from the anus, forming the posterior margin of the vulva
2. (Zoology) a less common name for furcula, frog3
[C18: from French: a little fork, from Old French forche , from Latin furca fork]

four•chette

(fʊərˈʃɛt)

n.
1. the fold of skin that forms the posterior margin of the vulva.
2. the wishbone of a bird.
[1745–55; < French, diminutive of fourche, Old French < Latin furca fork; see fork -ette]
Translations

four·chette

n. Fr. horquilla, comisura posterior de la vulva.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to faster velocity (17.8 [+ or -] 1.4 km/h), it has previously been reported that maximum force (-12.3%) and peak pressure (-15.1%) are lower while jogging (11.2 [+ or -] 0.9 km/h) on a treadmill at constant velocity (Fourchet et al., 2012).
running (+6.7% and +3.7%, respectively) at steady velocities at the expense of reduced relative load under the lesser toes (-8.4%) (Fourchet et al., 2012).
(70.) Fourchet F, Materne O, Horobeanu C, Hudacek T, Buchheit M.
The attending physician indicated on the standard form whether the woman had no tear, a first-degree tear (limited to the fourchet, the perineal skin, and the vaginal mucosa), a second-degree tear (extending to perineal muscles but saving the anal sphincter), a third-degree tear (involving muscles of the central nucleus and the anal sphincter with anal mucosa remaining intact), a fourth-degree tear (complete rupture of the anal sphincter through the mucosa),[28] or an episiotomy (with or without a third- or fourth-degree extension).
Gribble, P.A., Delahunt, E., Bleakley, C.M., Caulfield, B., Docherty, C.L., Fong, D.T., Fourchet, F., Hertel, J., Hiller, C.E., Kaminski, T.W., McKeon, P.O., Refshauge, K.M., van der Wees, P., Vicenzino, W.
Gribble P.A., Delahunt E., Bleakley C.M., Caulfield B., Docherty C.L., Fong D.T., Fourchet F., Hertel J., Hiller C.E., Kaminski T.W., McKeon P.O., Refshauge K.M., van der Wees P., Vicenzino W.
A number of studies (Bobbert and Van Ingen Schenau, 1988; Bobbert et al., 2002; Fourchet et al., 2012; Jones and Caldwell, 2003) suggest that muscle fatigue may affect the execution of the vertical jump with regard to the anterior-posterior direction of the movement.
This was shown in our recent comparison in plantar patterns between training shoes and racing spikes in young sprinters where we found a globally higher load under forefoot and toes with significantly more marked maximum force and mean pressure when wearing spikes (Fourchet et al., 2007).