fracas


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frac·as

(frăk′əs, frā′kəs)
n.
A noisy, disorderly fight or quarrel. See Synonyms at brawl.

[French, a sound of smashing, fracas, from French fracasser, to smash, from Italian fracassare, from Old Italian, perhaps from blend of Latin frangere, frāc-, to break; see fracture + Latin quassāre, to shake, shatter, break; see squash2.]
Usage Note: The traditional pronunciation of fracas has a long a in the first syllable, rhyming roughly with "break us." In the 2015 survey, only 59 percent of the Usage Panel found this pronunciation acceptable, and barely a third of the Panel preferred it. The pronunciation with a short a in the first syllable, rhyming roughly with "track us," is acceptable to 81 percent of the Panel and is in fact preferred by two-thirds of it, offering another example of how the pronunciation of a word can shift over time. · In British English, fracas is commonly pronounced frăk′ä and frə-kä′ (which is similar to the French pronunciation).

fracas

(ˈfrækɑː)
n
a noisy quarrel; brawl
[C18: from French, from fracasser to shatter, from Latin frangere to break, influenced by quassāre to shatter]

fra•cas

(ˈfreɪ kəs, ˈfræk əs; Brit. ˈfræk ɑ)

n.
a noisy disorderly disturbance or fight.
[1720–30; < French < Italian fracassare to smash]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fracas - noisy quarrelfracas - noisy quarrel        
dustup, quarrel, run-in, wrangle, row, words - an angry dispute; "they had a quarrel"; "they had words"
batrachomyomachia - a silly altercation

fracas

noun brawl, fight, trouble, row, riot, disturbance, quarrel, uproar, skirmish, scuffle, free-for-all (informal), rumpus, aggro (slang), affray (Law), shindig (informal), donnybrook, scrimmage, shindy (informal), bagarre (French), melee or mêlée In the ensuing fracas many were killed.

fracas

noun
Informal. A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Slang: rumble.
Translations
hádkarvačka

fracas

[ˈfrækɑː] Ngresca f, reyerta f

fracas

[ˈfrækɑː] nbagarre f

fracas

nAufruhr m, → Tumult m

fracas

[ˈfrækɑː] nrissa, lite f
References in classic literature ?
Fracas was bad for busi ness, he affirmed; but, in truth, this specimen of portly, middle-aged manhood was of a timid dis position.
From the right came the noise of a terrific fracas.
Fanny read to herself that "it was with infinite concern the newspaper had to announce to the world a matrimonial fracas in the family of Mr.
A loud and violent fracas took place between the infantry Colonel and his lady, who were dining at the Cafe de Paris, and Colonel and Mrs.
At all events, at my hotel in Paris I received far more attention from the company after I had told them about the fracas with the sacristan.
It would have been short shrift for John de Fulm had not some of his men heard the fracas, and rushed to his aid.
A slight fracas between two young gentlemen occurring last night within a hundred miles of these peaceful walls (Miss Ferdinand, being apparently incorrigible, will have the kindness to write out this evening, in the original language, the first four fables of our vivacious neighbour, Monsieur La Fontaine) had been very grossly exaggerated by Rumour's voice.
There was a wayward gleam in them, as if they enjoyed the fracas.
No one was excited even when a fracas on the steps of a leading hotel in Piccadilly, in which he tried to horse-whip a prominent German musician upon some personal account, delayed his promised ascent.
The police have picked up the matter for investigations to establish what led to the fracas and those who were behind.
The post Police investigating attempted murder after campsite fracas appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
She added the witness was credible and told of a drug-fuelled party and a fracas after Mr Kenney told Barrymore that Mr Lubbock was straight.