fragmentation


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frag·men·ta·tion

 (frăg′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
1. The act or process of breaking into fragments.
2. The scattering of the fragments of an exploding bomb or other projectile.
3. Computers The scattering of parts of a file or files throughout a storage device, as when the operating system breaks up the file and fits it into the spaces left vacant by previously deleted files.

fragmentation

(ˌfræɡmɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act of fragmenting or the state of being fragmented
2. (Sociology) the disintegration of norms regulating behaviour, thought, and social relationships
3. (Military) the steel particles of an exploded projectile
4. (Military) (modifier) of or relating to a weapon designed to explode into many small pieces, esp as an antipersonnel weapon: a fragmentation bomb.

frag•men•ta•tion

(ˌfræg mənˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of fragmenting or the state of being fragmented.
adj.
2. of or designating an explosive device designed to scatter small metal fragments on detonation: a fragmentation grenade.
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fragmentation - separating something into fine particles
division - the act or process of dividing
2.fragmentation - the disintegration of social norms governing behavior and thought and social relationships
disintegration, decomposition - in a decomposed state
3.fragmentation - (computer science) the condition of a file that is broken up and stored in many different locations on a magnetic disk; "fragmentation slows system performance because it takes extra time to locate and assemble the parts of the fragmented file"
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
storage - (computer science) the process of storing information in a computer memory or on a magnetic tape or disk
4.fragmentation - the scattering of bomb fragments after the bomb explodes
blowup, detonation, explosion - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
Translations
fragmentacija

fragmentation

[ˌfrægmenˈteɪʃən]
A. Nfragmentación f
B. CPD fragmentation grenade Ngranada f de fragmentación

fragmentation

n (of rock, glass)Zerbrechen nt; (fig)Fragmentierung f; (of society)Zerfall m; (of hopes)Zerschlagung f

fragmentation

[ˌfrægmɛnˈteɪʃən] nframmentazione f
References in classic literature ?
The world passed at a stride from a unity and simplicity broader than that of the Roman Empire at its best, to as social fragmentation as complete as the robber-baron period of the Middle Ages.
He reminds us that an understanding of the techniques of fragmentation and fusion are carefully employed in Morrison's narrative emphasis on the telling of the story.
The second section includes a series of historical essays touching on the fragmentation at various moments in the Christian past.
The second factor relating to the process of fragmentation is the issue of identity.
In the history of science, a twofold process can be seen: a fragmentation of formal disciplines and a recombination of the specialties resulting from this fragmentation.
Problems of access to health care providers and, to a minor degree, fragmentation of care are causing this market-driven change as well.
Sandia project leader James Ang said that useful information about hypervelocity fragmentation is difficult to obtain from 2-D photography.
This article focuses on professional status, identifies four areas of professional fragmentation that impact our current standing, (title transition, professional preparation, credentialing, and professional associations) and suggests ways in which to enhance professional growth.
Langgal said Dela Cruz, armed with an PRB423 anti-dispersal fragmentation plastic grenade, had a quarrel with his wife, who is a house helper of a former judge.
KEYWORDS: distributed systems, fragmentation, replication, allocation, implementation activities.
Analyze index fragmentation on local and remote SQL Server instances