frame house


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Related to frame house: frame construction

frame house

n
(Building) a house that has a timber framework and cladding
Translations

frame house

nHolzhaus nt, → Haus ntmit Holzrahmen
References in classic literature ?
UPON THE HALF decayed veranda of a small frame house that stood near the edge of a ravine near the town of Winesburg, Ohio, a fat little old man walked nervously up and down.
Our white frame house, with a storey and half-storey above the basement, stood at the east end of what I might call the farmyard, with the windmill close by the kitchen door.
Just on the crest, where Spofford Avenue petered out into a plain road, was a little white frame house with groups of pines on either side of it, stretching their arms protectingly over its low roof.
The light frame house leaked the noise hideously, and Saxon knew that the houses on either side were hearing, and the street itself and the houses across the street.
For the next five minutes I smoked at every pore, like a frame house that is on fire on the inside.
In back of the yards the dreary two-story frame houses were scattered farther apart, and there were great spaces bare--that seemingly had been overlooked by the great sore of a city as it spread itself over the surface of the prairie.
South Wales Fire and Rescue Service was called to the empty detached, three-storey timber frame house on Robin Hill at 9.17pm.
Like any other frame house on the street, it had a lawn, a door, a
I have a farm with lots of woods and I would like to use my own trees for a timber frame house. Is this possible?
On the hillside is the Hurd residence, a two-story frame house with a tower belonging to local lumberman and shipper Oscar W.
OXFORD - A two-story, wood frame house was heavily damaged by a fire of undetermined cause Tuesday afternoon.
Peterson presents Homes in the Heartland: Balloon Frame Farmhouses of the Upper Midwest, the true story of the architectural phenomenon of balloon frame house construction that pervaded Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin from 1850 to 1920, which allowed settlers to establish affordable permanent frontier homes.